Associations to the word «Diagonal»

Wiktionary

DIAGONAL, adjective. (geometry) Joining two nonadjacent vertices (of a polygon or polyhedron).
DIAGONAL, adjective. Having a slanted or oblique direction, lines or markings.
DIAGONAL, adjective. Pertaining to the front left and back right (or the front right and back left) legs of a quadruped.
DIAGONAL, noun. Something arranged diagonally or obliquely
DIAGONAL, noun. A line or cut across a fabric that is not at right angles to a side of the fabric
DIAGONAL, noun. A punctuation mark used to separate related items of information
DIAGONAL, noun. (geometry) a diagonal line or plane
DIAGONAL, noun. (geometry) a line joining non-adjacent vertices of a polygon.
DIAGONAL ELEMENT, noun. (linear algebra) An element on the main diagonal of a square matrix, that is, an element in row k and column k where k is an integer between 1 and the number of rows (or columns) in the matrix.
DIAGONAL ELEMENTS, noun. Plural of diagonal element
DIAGONAL MATRICES, noun. Plural of diagonal matrix
DIAGONAL MATRIX, noun. (linear algebra) A matrix in which only the entries on the main diagonal are non-zero.

Dictionary definition

DIAGONAL, noun. (geometry) a straight line connecting any two vertices of a polygon that are not adjacent.
DIAGONAL, noun. A line or cut across a fabric that is not at right angles to a side of the fabric.
DIAGONAL, noun. An oblique line of squares of the same color on a checkerboard; "the bishop moves on the diagonals".
DIAGONAL, noun. (mathematics) a set of entries in a square matrix running diagonally either from the upper left to lower right entry or running from the upper right to lower left entry.
DIAGONAL, noun. A punctuation mark (/) used to separate related items of information.
DIAGONAL, adjective. Connecting two nonadjacent corners of a plane figure or any two corners of a solid that are not in the same face; "a diagonal line across the page".
DIAGONAL, adjective. Having an oblique or slanted direction.

Wise words

Wisdom does not show itself so much in precept as in life - in firmness of mind and a mastery of appetite. It teaches us to do, as well as talk, and to make our words and actions all of a color.
Lucius Annaeus Seneca