Associations to the word «Pyramid»

Pictures for the word «Pyramid»

Wiktionary

PYRAMID, noun. An ancient massive construction with a square or rectangular base and four triangular sides meeting in an apex, such as those built as tombs in Egypt or as bases for temples in Mesoamerica.
PYRAMID, noun. A construction in the shape of a pyramid, usually with a square or rectangular base.
PYRAMID, noun. (geometry) A solid with triangular lateral faces and a polygonal (often square or rectangular) base.
PYRAMID, noun. (UK) (dated) The game of pool in which the balls are placed in the form of a triangle at spot.
PYRAMID, noun. A pyramid scheme.
PYRAMID, verb. (transitive) (genetics) To combine (a series of genes) into a single genotype.
PYRAMID, verb. (intransitive) To employ, or take part in, a pyramid scheme.
PYRAMID SCHEME, noun. An illicit money-making investment scheme whereby early investors are paid primarily or wholly by later investors. Eventually all such schemes fail to the detriment of recent (later) investors.
PYRAMID SCHEMES, noun. Plural of pyramid scheme

Dictionary definition

PYRAMID, noun. A polyhedron having a polygonal base and triangular sides with a common vertex.
PYRAMID, noun. (stock market) a series of transactions in which the speculator increases his holdings by using the rising market value of those holdings as margin for further purchases.
PYRAMID, noun. A massive monument with a square base and four triangular sides; begun by Cheops around 2700 BC as royal tombs in ancient Egypt.
PYRAMID, verb. Enlarge one's holdings on an exchange on a continued rise by using paper profits as margin to buy additional amounts.
PYRAMID, verb. Use or deal in (as of stock or commercial transaction) in a pyramid deal.
PYRAMID, verb. Arrange or build up as if on the base of a pyramid.
PYRAMID, verb. Increase rapidly and progressively step by step on a broad base.

Wise words

Words are always getting conventionalized to some secondary meaning. It is one of the works of poetry to take the truants in custody and bring them back to their right senses.
William Butler Yeats