Associations to the word «Wheat»

Pictures for the word «Wheat»

Wiktionary

WHEAT, noun. (countable) any of several cereal grains, of the genus Triticum, that yields flour as used in bakery.
WHEAT, noun. (uncountable) a light brown colour, like that of wheat.
WHEAT, adjective. Wheaten, of a light brown colour, like that of wheat.
WHEAT BISK, noun. A conglomeration of cereal fibres in lozenge form.
WHEAT BISKS, noun. Plural of wheat bisk
WHEAT BREAD, noun. Bread made from wheat flour
WHEAT BREAD, noun. (slang) whole-wheat bread (bread made from whole wheat flour)
WHEAT FLOUR, noun. (US standard of identity) exact synonym of flour
WHEAT GERM, noun. Embryo or nucleus of the wheat kernel.
WHEAT PASTE, noun. A gel or liquid adhesive made from wheat flour or starch and water.
WHEAT PENNY, noun. A US one cent coin produced from 1909 to 1959, having a portrait of Abraham Lincoln on the obverse and a pair of ears of wheat on the reverse
WHEAT SAWFLIES, noun. Plural of wheat sawfly
WHEAT SAWFLY, noun. A small European sawfly (Cephus pygmaeus) whose larvae damage wheat by boring in the stalks.
WHEAT SAWFLY, noun. Any of several small American sawflies of the genus Dolerus, such as Dolerus sericeus and Dolerus arvensis, whose larvae damage the stems or heads of wheat.
WHEAT SAWFLY, noun. Pachynematus extensicornis, whose larvae feed chiefly on the blades of wheat.
WHEAT STARCH, noun. Starch obtained from wheat
WHEAT THIEF, noun. Gromwell
WHEAT WEEVIL, noun. A common species of weevil (Sitophilus granarius) that occurs worldwide and causes damage to harvested grain.
WHEAT WEEVILS, noun. Plural of wheat weevil

Dictionary definition

WHEAT, noun. Annual or biennial grass having erect flower spikes and light brown grains.
WHEAT, noun. Grains of common wheat; sometimes cooked whole or cracked as cereal; usually ground into flour.
WHEAT, noun. A variable yellow tint; dull yellow, often diluted with white.

Wise words

All the great things are simple, and many can be expressed in a single word: freedom, justice, honor, duty, mercy, hope.
Winston Churchill