Associations to the word «Wait»

Wiktionary

WAIT, verb. (transitive) (now) (rare) To delay movement or action until the arrival or occurrence of; to await. (Now generally superseded by “wait for”.)
WAIT, verb. (intransitive) To delay movement or action until some event or time; to remain neglected or in readiness.
WAIT, verb. (intransitive) (US) To wait tables; to serve customers in a restaurant or other eating establishment.
WAIT, verb. (obsolete) To attend on; to accompany; especially, to attend with ceremony or respect.
WAIT, verb. (obsolete) To attend as a consequence; to follow upon; to accompany.
WAIT, verb. (obsolete) To defer or postpone (a meal).
WAIT, noun. A delay.
WAIT, noun. An ambush.
WAIT, noun. (obsolete) One who watches; a watchman.
WAIT, noun. (in the plural) (obsolete) (UK) Hautboys, or oboes, played by town musicians.
WAIT, noun. (in the plural) (archaic) (UK) Musicians who sing or play at night or in the early morning, especially at Christmas time; serenaders; musical watchmen. [formerly waites, wayghtes.]
WAIT FOR, verb. To wait until the specified event occurs.
WAIT FOR, verb. To await the arrival of.
WAIT FOR THE BALL TO DROP, verb. (idiomatic) (rare) To wait in expectation of an occurrence.
WAIT FOR THE OTHER SHOE TO DROP, verb. (idiomatic) To defer action or decision until another matter is finished or resolved.
WAIT FOR THE OTHER SHOE TO DROP, verb. (idiomatic) To await a seemingly inevitable event, especially one that is not desirable.
WAIT ON, verb. (colloquial) To wait for an event.
WAIT ON, verb. To wait for a person to do something.
WAIT ON, verb. To serve someone.
WAIT ON, verb. (archaic) To attend; to go to see; to visit on business or for ceremony.
WAIT ON, verb. (archaic) To follow, as a consequence; to await.
WAIT ON, verb. (archaic) To attend to; to perform.
WAIT ON, verb. (falconry) To fly above its master, waiting till game is sprung; said of a hawk.
WAIT ON, verb. Used other than as an idiom: see wait,‎ on.
WAIT ON HAND AND FOOT, verb. (transitive) To attend to (someone's) every need, to the point of excess.
WAIT ON HAND, FOOT AND FINGER, verb. (idiomatic) Alternative form of wait on hand and foot
WAIT ON SOMEONE HAND, FOOT AND FINGER, verb. (idiomatic) Alternative form of wait on hand and foot
WAIT ON SOMEONE HAND, FOOT, AND FINGER, verb. (idiomatic) Alternative form of wait on hand and foot
WAIT OUT, verb. (idiomatic) To wait through (something); wait (through) till the end; patiently endure.
WAIT STATE, noun. (computing) Any of several instances in which a computer's processor cannot execute instructions (either for the entire computer, or just for a specific task) until an I/O operation completes, or until an interrupt is resolved
WAIT STATES, noun. Plural of wait state
WAIT TABLES, verb. To wait as a server in a restaurant or other dine-in eatery.
WAIT UP, verb. To stay awake waiting for somebody to return.
WAIT UP, verb. (colloquial) (often used in the imperative) (US) To wait.
WAIT UPON, verb. To wait on; to serve.
WAIT UPON HAND AND FOOT, verb. (idiomatic) (formal) Alternative form of wait on hand and foot

Dictionary definition

WAIT, noun. Time during which some action is awaited; "instant replay caused too long a delay"; "he ordered a hold in the action".
WAIT, noun. The act of waiting (remaining inactive in one place while expecting something); "the wait was an ordeal for him".
WAIT, verb. Stay in one place and anticipate or expect something; "I had to wait on line for an hour to get the tickets".
WAIT, verb. Wait before acting; "the scientists held off announcing their results until they repeated the experiment".
WAIT, verb. Look forward to the probable occurrence of; "We were expecting a visit from our relatives"; "She is looking to a promotion"; "he is waiting to be drafted".
WAIT, verb. Serve as a waiter or waitress in a restaurant; "I'm waiting on tables at Maxim's".

Wise words

False words are not only evil in themselves, but they infect the soul with evil.
Socrates