Associations to the word «Brick»

Pictures for the word «Brick»

Wiktionary

BRICK, noun. (countable) A hardened rectangular block of mud, clay etc., used for building.
BRICK, noun. (uncountable) Considered collectively, as a building material.
BRICK, noun. (countable) Something shaped like a brick.
BRICK, noun. (dated) A helpful and reliable person.
BRICK, noun. (basketball) (slang) A shot which misses, particularly one which bounces directly out of the basket because of a too-flat trajectory, as if the ball were a heavier object.
BRICK, noun. (informal) A power brick; an external power supply consisting of a small box with an integral male power plug and an attached electric cord terminating in another power plug.
BRICK, noun. (technology) (slang) An electronic device, especially a heavy box-shaped one, that has become non-functional or obsolete.
BRICK, noun. (firearms) a carton of 500 rimfire cartridges, which forms the approximate size and shape of a brick.
BRICK, noun. (poker slang) A community card (usually the turn or the river) which does not improve a player's hand.
BRICK, adjective. Made of brick(s).
BRICK, verb. To build with bricks.
BRICK, verb. To make into bricks.
BRICK, verb. (slang) To hit someone or something with a brick.
BRICK, verb. (computing slang) To make an electronic device nonfunctional and usually beyond repair, essentially making it no more useful than a brick.
BRICK, proper noun. A surname​.
BRICK AND MORTAR, adjective. (business) Buildings and property for the conduct of business, particularly in the sale of retail goods to the general public. (Used to contrast an Internet-based sales operation that lacks customer-oriented store fronts and a "traditional" one for which most capital investment might be in the building infrastructure.) [since the mid-1990s]
BRICK AND MORTAR, noun. Used other than as an idiom: see brick,‎ and,‎ mortar.
BRICK AND MORTAR, noun. (UK) Buildings, especially domestic housing.
BRICK BY BRICK, adverb. (idiomatic) to create or build something in a steady, step-by-step fashion.
BRICK HOUSE, noun. A voluptuous woman with a large rotund buttocks and bust.
BRICK HOUSE, noun. Used other than as an idiom: see A house or type of construction made of bricks or blockss of masonry.
BRICK HOUSES, noun. Plural of brick house
BRICK IN, verb. (transitive) (idiomatic) to enclose with bricks
BRICK IN ONE'S HAT, noun. (US) (obsolete) (idiomatic) drunkenness.
BRICK IT, verb. (vulgar) (informal) To be scared; to be terrified.
BRICK PHONE, noun. A cellular telephone with proportions and weight similar to a brick
BRICK PHONE, noun. Alternative form of bricked phone (a non-functional mobile phone)
BRICK PHONES, noun. Plural of brick phone
BRICK RED, noun. Warm brownish-red colour similar to that of red clay bricks.
BRICK RED, adjective. Of a warm brownish-red colour similar to that of red clay bricks.
BRICK SHITHOUSE, noun. An article built more robustly than its function requires; implies an element of indestructability.
BRICK SHITHOUSE, noun. A person with a well-developed body.
BRICK SHITHOUSES, noun. Plural of brick shithouse
BRICK TOAST, noun. A Taiwanese sweet butter bread shaped in a block and often served with ice cream.
BRICK UP, verb. To block by masonry, particularly using bricks
BRICK VENEER, noun. (architecture) A building construction technique in which an external, non-structural, brick wall conceals a structural wall of another material (such as timber or steel).
BRICK VENEERS, noun. Plural of brick veneer
BRICK WALL, noun. Used other than as an idiom: see brick,‎ wall.
BRICK WALL, noun. A wall made of bricks.
BRICK WALL, noun. (figurative) An obstacle.
BRICK WALL, noun. (figurative) Someone who is silent or unresponsive.
BRICK WALLS, noun. Plural of brick wall

Dictionary definition

BRICK, noun. Rectangular block of clay baked by the sun or in a kiln; used as a building or paving material.
BRICK, noun. A good fellow; helpful and trustworthy.

Wise words

A designer knows he has achieved perfection not when there is nothing left to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.
Antoine de Saint-Exupery