Associations to the word «Fringe»

Wiktionary

FRINGE, noun. A decorative border.
FRINGE, noun. A marginal or peripheral part.
FRINGE, noun. Those members of a political party, or any social group, holding unorthodox views.
FRINGE, noun. The periphery of a town or city.
FRINGE, noun. That part of the hair that hangs down above the eyes; bangs.
FRINGE, noun. (physics) A light or dark band formed by the diffraction of light.
FRINGE, noun. Non-mainstream theatre.
FRINGE, noun. (botany) The peristome or fringe-like appendage of the capsules of most mosses.
FRINGE, adjective. Outside the mainstream.
FRINGE, verb. (transitive) To decorate with fringe.
FRINGE, verb. (transitive) To serve as a fringe.
FRINGE BENEFIT, noun. A benefit received in addition to the normal benefits of holding a job, or, by extension, any relationship to the source of the benefit.
FRINGE BENEFITS, noun. Plural of fringe benefit
FRINGE TREE, noun. A small tree (Chionanthus virginicus) of the southern United States, having white flowers with long pendulous petals.
FRINGE TREES, noun. Plural of fringe tree

Dictionary definition

FRINGE, noun. The outside boundary or surface of something.
FRINGE, noun. A part of the city far removed from the center; "they built a factory on the outskirts of the city".
FRINGE, noun. One of the light or dark bands produced by the interference and diffraction of light.
FRINGE, noun. A social group holding marginal or extreme views; "members of the fringe believe we should be armed with guns at all times".
FRINGE, noun. A border of hair that is cut short and hangs across the forehead.
FRINGE, noun. An ornamental border consisting of short lengths of hanging threads or tassels.
FRINGE, verb. Adorn with a fringe; "The weaver fringed the scarf".
FRINGE, verb. Decorate with or as if with a surrounding fringe; "fur fringed the hem of the dress".

Wise words

Words are always getting conventionalized to some secondary meaning. It is one of the works of poetry to take the truants in custody and bring them back to their right senses.
William Butler Yeats