Associations to the word «Box»

Wiktionary

BOX, noun. A cuboid space; a container, usually with a hinged lid.
BOX, noun. As much as fills a such a container.
BOX, noun. A compartment of a storage furniture, or of a part of such a furniture, such as of a drawer, shelving, etc.
BOX, noun. A compartment to sit in at a theater, courtroom or auditorium.
BOX, noun. A small rectangular shelter like a booth.
BOX, noun. A rectangle.
BOX, noun. An input field on an interactive electronic display.
BOX, noun. A numbered receptacle at a newspaper office for anonymous replies to advertisements.
BOX, noun. A trap or predicament.
BOX, noun. The driver's seat on a coach.
BOX, noun. (cricket)   A hard protector for the genitals worn by a batsman or close fielder inside the underpants.
BOX, noun. (engineering)   A cylindrical casing around for example a bearing or gland.
BOX, noun. (football)   The penalty area.
BOX, noun. (computing) (slang)   A computer, or the case in which it is housed.
BOX, noun. (slang) (with the)   Television.
BOX, noun. (slang) (offensive)   The vagina.
BOX, noun. (euphemistic)   Coffin.
BOX, noun. (juggling)   A pattern usually performed with three balls where the movements of the balls make a boxlike shape.
BOX, noun. Horse box.
BOX, noun. (baseball) The rectangle in which the batter stands.
BOX, noun. A Mediterranean food fish; the bogue.
BOX, noun. (dated) A small country house.
BOX, noun. (informal) box lacrosse
BOX, verb. (transitive) To place inside a box; to pack in boxes.
BOX, verb. (transitive) (usually with 'in') To hem in.
BOX, verb. (transitive) (computing) To place a value of a primitive type into a corresponding object.
BOX, verb. (transitive) To mix two containers of paint of similar color to ensure that the color is identical.
BOX, verb. (transitive) To furnish (e.g. a wheel) with boxes.
BOX, verb. (architecture) To enclose with boarding, lathing, etc., so as to bring to a required form.
BOX, verb. (transitive) To make an incision or hole in (a tree) for the purpose of procuring the sap.
BOX, noun. Any of various evergreen shrubs or trees of the genus Buxus.
BOX, noun. Boxwood: the wood from a box tree.
BOX, noun. (Australia) Species of Lophostemon.
BOX, noun. (slang) A musical instrument, especially/usually one made from boxwood.
BOX, noun. A blow with the fist.
BOX, verb. (transitive) To strike with fists; to punch.
BOX, verb. (transitive) To fight against (a person) in a boxing match.
BOX, verb. (intransitive) To participate in boxing; to be a boxer.
BOX AND COX, noun. Two people who occupy the same post or location in an alternating arrangement.
BOX AND WHISKERS PLOT, noun. (statistics) A graphical summary of a numerical data sample through five statistics — median, upper quartile, lower quartile, and upper extreme and lower extreme values — by depiction as a box with its edges at the quartile marks and an internal line at the median and with lines protruding from the box as far as the extremal values.
BOX CALF, noun. A type of chromium-tanned calfskin leather with a regular grain of rectangular lines.
BOX CAMERA, noun. (photography) A very simple type of photographic camera, being box shaped, and with a simple lens, and using roll film for taking snapshot pictures.
BOX CAMERAS, noun. Plural of box camera
BOX CANYON, noun. A canyon which has a single access for entrance and exit, being otherwise enclosed on all sides by steep walls.
BOX CAR, noun. Alternative form of boxcar
BOX CLEVER, verb. (idiomatic) (intransitive) To act wisely.
BOX CUTTER, noun. Alternative form of boxcutter
BOX CUTTERS, noun. Plural of box cutter
BOX ELDER, noun. Acer negundo
BOX ELDER MAPLE, noun. Acer negundo
BOX GIRDER, noun. A steel beam with a hollow rectangular cross section; used for constructing bridges
BOX HOUSE, noun. A saloon with cubicles in which customers could tryst with waitresses.
BOX IN, verb. To enclose by drawing a box around
BOX IN, verb. To immobilize something, usually a vehicle, by placing obstacles, usually other vehicles, obstructing the free movement
BOX IN, verb. To limit someone's freedom of thought, movement, expression, etc.
BOX IRON, noun. A hollow smoothing iron containing a heater within.
BOX IRONS, noun. Plural of box iron
BOX JELLIES, noun. Plural of box jelly
BOX JELLY, noun. Box jellyfish
BOX JELLYFISH, noun. Pacific jellyfish of class Cubozoa.
BOX KICK, noun. (rugby) A type of kick performed by the scrum-half (or very rarely acting scrum-half). From the base of a ruck, maul or scrum, the scrum-half will stand sideways onto the opposition with his kicking foot further from them, and kick the ball high into the air so as to hopefully prevent the opposition charging down the kick.
BOX KICK, verb. To kick the ball in the manner described above.
BOX KITE, noun. A kite consisting of two light rectangular boxes, or cells open on two sides, and fastened together horizontally.
BOX KITES, noun. Plural of box kite
BOX LACROSSE, noun. An indoor version of lacrosse played mostly in North America, and distinguished from field lacrosse.
BOX LEVEL, noun. A spirit level in which a glass-covered box is used instead of a tube.
BOX MODEL, noun. (CSS) The set of rules that governs the size, shape, spacing, borders, and margins of page elements.
BOX OFF, verb. (nautical) To turn the head of a vessel either way by bracing the headyards aback.
BOX OFFICE, noun. (countable) (film) (theater) A place where tickets are sold in a theatre/theater or cinema.
BOX OFFICE, noun. (uncountable) (by extension) (film) the total amount of money paid by people worldwide to watch a movie at cinemas/movie theaters.
BOX OFFICES, noun. Plural of box office
BOX ONESELF INTO A CORNER, verb. (idiomatic) To create a predicament or problem for oneself; to do something that leaves one with no good alternatives. or solutions.
BOX OUT, verb. (basketball) To position oneself between an opposition player and the basket in anticipation of getting a rebound.
BOX PLOT, noun. (statistics) A graphical summary of a numerical data sample through five statistics: median, lower quartile, upper quartile, and some indication of more extreme upper and lower values.
BOX PLOTS, noun. Plural of box plot
BOX ROOM, noun. A small bedroom in a house, often used for storage.
BOX ROOMS, noun. Plural of box room
BOX SCORE, noun. (sports) (North America) A score showing the final scores of the teams in a game, as well as certain individual and team achievements.
BOX SCORES, noun. Plural of box score
BOX SEAT, noun. A seat among a group of seats in an enclosure, as at a theater or stadium.
BOX SEAT, noun. (idiomatic) A favorable vantage point.
BOX SEATS, noun. Plural of box seat
BOX SET, noun. Related musical or video recordings that are gathered on multiple compact discs, DVDs or Blu-rays, and placed in a box, along with a small booklet.
BOX SET, noun. A set of related books from a particular author or genre that are contained within a box.
BOX SETS, noun. Plural of box set
BOX SOCIAL, noun. (US) A fundraising event in which boxes are decorated and filled with meals for two (traditionally by women) and others (traditionally men) bid on them, anticipating a meal with the preparer.
BOX SOCIAL, noun. (UK) (historical) A Victorian social event for young people.
BOX SOCIALS, noun. Plural of box social
BOX SPRING, noun. A box-shaped frame into which is a set of spiral springs, upon which rests a bed mattress.
BOX SUPPER, noun. A box social, especially in Ozark culture.
BOX SUPPERS, noun. Plural of box supper
BOX TAIL, noun. (aviation) An aircraft's tail or rudder, usually fixed, resembling a box kite.
BOX THE COMPASS, verb. (nautical) To know, and be able to recite the 32 points and quarter points of the magnetic compass from North, both clockwise and anticlockwise.
BOX THE COMPASS, verb. (idiomatic) To make a complete reversal in stance or opinion.
BOX THE GNAT, noun. A dance movement for 2 dancers. The dancers step forward, join hands, then raise hands. The lady takes a step forward and does a left-face U turn back under the raised joined hands, while the man walks forward and around the lady while doing a right-face U turn back.
BOX THE GNAT, verb. It can also be used as a verb.
BOX TREE, noun. Any of several trees, of the genus Buxus, often used as a hedge and as a source of boxwood
BOX TREE, noun. Any trees of diverse species in a few families, native to Australia.
BOX TURTLE, noun. A turtle of the genus Terrapene (the North American box turtles), or of Cuora or Pyxidea (the Asian box turtles), characterised by having a domed shell that is hinged at the bottom, allowing the animal to close its shell tightly to escape predators.
BOX TURTLES, noun. Plural of box turtle
BOX UP, verb. (transitive) To pack into boxes.
BOX UP, verb. (transitive) To confine.
BOX WINE, noun. A type of wine that is sealed in a plastic bladder and packaged in a cardboard box
BOX ZITHER, noun. (musical instrument) A zither with a trapezoidal or rectangular shaped sound box.
BOX ZITHERS, noun. Plural of box zither

Dictionary definition

BOX, noun. A (usually rectangular) container; may have a lid; "he rummaged through a box of spare parts".
BOX, noun. Private area in a theater or grandstand where a small group can watch the performance; "the royal box was empty".
BOX, noun. The quantity contained in a box; "he gave her a box of chocolates".
BOX, noun. A predicament from which a skillful or graceful escape is impossible; "his lying got him into a tight corner".
BOX, noun. A rectangular drawing; "the flowchart contained many boxes".
BOX, noun. Evergreen shrubs or small trees.
BOX, noun. Any one of several designated areas on a ball field where the batter or catcher or coaches are positioned; "the umpire warned the batter to stay in the batter's box".
BOX, noun. The driver's seat on a coach; "an armed guard sat in the box with the driver".
BOX, noun. Separate partitioned area in a public place for a few people; "the sentry stayed in his box to avoid the cold".
BOX, noun. A blow with the hand (usually on the ear); "I gave him a good box on the ear".
BOX, verb. Put into a box; "box the gift, please".
BOX, verb. Hit with the fist; "I'll box your ears!".
BOX, verb. Engage in a boxing match.

Wise words

Abuse of words has been the great instrument of sophistry and chicanery, of party, faction, and division of society.
John Adams