Associations to the word «Railway»

Wiktionary

RAILWAY, noun. (chiefly UK) (Ireland and Commonwealth) A track, consisting of parallel rails, over which wheeled vehicles such as trains may travel.
RAILWAY, noun. (chiefly UK) (Ireland and Commonwealth) A transport system using these rails used to move passengers or goods.
RAILWAY CARRIAGE, noun. Railroad car
RAILWAY CARRIAGES, noun. Plural of railway carriage
RAILWAY GUN, noun. (military) a large mobile artillery gun mounted on a railroad rail car
RAILWAY GUNS, noun. Plural of railway gun
RAILWAY LINE, noun. (chiefly UK) A railway track; a pair of rails on which a railway train runs.
RAILWAY LINE, noun. (chiefly UK) A group of railway tracks running parallel, allowing one track to be used for each direction (a double-track railway line), or allowing segregation of fast trains from stopping trains (a four-track railway line).
RAILWAY LINE, noun. (chiefly UK) An organization that runs a railroad.
RAILWAY LINES, noun. Plural of railway line
RAILWAY SLEEPER, noun. (chiefly UK) A railroad tie.
RAILWAY SLEEPERS, noun. Plural of railway sleeper
RAILWAY STATION, noun. (British) A place where trains stop for passengers to embark and disembark.
RAILWAY STATIONS, noun. Plural of railway station
RAILWAY TIE, noun. Alternative form of railroad tie
RAILWAY TIME, noun. (historical) A standardized time arrangement formerly used by railways to overcome the confusion caused by varying local times at different stations.
RAILWAY TRACK, noun. A pair of parallel tracks along which a railway train runs.
RAILWAY TRAIN, noun. A locomotive plus the carriages that it pulls along a railway track.
RAILWAY VEHICLE, noun. (UK) railroad car
RAILWAY VEHICLES, noun. Plural of railway vehicle

Dictionary definition

RAILWAY, noun. Line that is the commercial organization responsible for operating a system of transportation for trains that pull passengers or freight.
RAILWAY, noun. A line of track providing a runway for wheels; "he walked along the railroad track".

Wise words

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Edward George Bulwer-Lytton