Associations to the word «Click»

Wiktionary

CLICK, noun. A brief, sharp, not particularly loud, relatively high-pitched sound produced by the impact of something small and hard against something hard, such as by the operation of a switch, a lock or a latch, or a finger pressed against the thumb and then released to strike the hand.
CLICK, noun. (phonetics) An ingressive sound made by coarticulating a velar or uvular closure with another closure.
CLICK, noun. Sound made by a dolphin.
CLICK, noun. The act of operating a switch, etc., so that it clicks.
CLICK, noun. The act of pressing a button on a computer mouse, both as a physical act and a reaction in the software.
CLICK, noun. (by extension) A single instance of content on the internet being accessed.
CLICK, verb. (transitive) To cause to make a click; to operate (a switch, etc) so that it makes a click.
CLICK, verb. (transitive) (direct and indirect) To press and release (a button on a computer mouse).
CLICK, verb. (transitive) To select a software item using, usually, but not always, the pressing of a mouse button.
CLICK, verb. (transitive) (advertising) To visit a web site.
CLICK, verb. (intransitive) To emit a click.
CLICK, verb. (intransitive) To click the left button of a computer mouse while pointing.
CLICK, verb. (intransitive) To make sense suddenly.
CLICK, verb. (intransitive) To get on well.
CLICK, verb. (dated) (intransitive) To tick.
CLICK, interjection. The sound of a click.
CLICK, noun. Alternative spelling of klick
CLICK, noun. A detent, pawl, or ratchet, such as that which catches the cogs of a ratchet wheel to prevent backward motion.
CLICK, noun. (UK) (dialect) The latch of a door.
CLICK, verb. (obsolete) To snatch.
CLICK, noun. (US) Misspelling of clique.
CLICK, verb. (US) Misspelling of clique.
CLICK BAIT, noun. Alternative form of clickbait
CLICK BEETLE, noun. Any of various beetles of the family Elateridae, generally less than 20 mm long, which if turned upside down, flip themselves into the air with a clicking sound.
CLICK BEETLES, noun. Plural of click beetle
CLICK CHEMISTRY, noun. A philosophy of chemistry in which substances are generated quickly and reliably by joining small modular units together, as in nature.
CLICK FRAUD, noun. (Internet) A type of fraud in which a computer program is used to simulate mouse clicks on advertisements, driving revenue to the advertiser, who is paid per click.
CLICK OF DEATH, noun. (computing) (informal) A clicking sound produced by the unexpected movement of the read-write actuator in a Zip drive, associated with hardware failure.
CLICK ONE'S FINGERS, verb. To pull or push one's fingers so that they make a cracking noise.
CLICK THROUGH, verb. (Internet) To click on a link in order to move to another page.
CLICK TRACK, noun. (music) A series of audio cues used to synchronize sound recordings, sometimes to a moving image.
CLICK TRACKS, noun. Plural of click track
CLICK WHEEL, noun. The combination button-and-scroll-wheel selection device of some iPods.
CLICK WHEELS, noun. Plural of click wheel

Dictionary definition

CLICK, noun. A short light metallic sound.
CLICK, noun. A stop consonant made by the suction of air into the mouth (as in Bantu).
CLICK, noun. A hinged catch that fits into a notch of a ratchet to move a wheel forward or prevent it from moving backward.
CLICK, noun. Depression of a button on a computer mouse; "a click on the right button for example".
CLICK, verb. Move or strike with a noise; "he clicked on the light"; "his arm was snapped forward".
CLICK, verb. Make a clicking or ticking sound; "The clock ticked away".
CLICK, verb. Click repeatedly or uncontrollably; "Chattering teeth".
CLICK, verb. Cause to make a snapping sound; "snap your fingers".
CLICK, verb. Produce a click; "Xhosa speakers click".
CLICK, verb. Make a clucking sounds, characteristic of hens.
CLICK, verb. Become clear or enter one's consciousness or emotions; "It dawned on him that she had betrayed him"; "she was penetrated with sorrow".

Wise words

Kind words can be short and easy to speak, but their echoes are truly endless.
Mother Teresa