Associations to the word «Spill»

Wiktionary

SPILL, verb. (transitive) To drop something so that it spreads out or makes a mess; to accidentally pour.
SPILL, verb. (intransitive) To spread out or fall out, as above.
SPILL, verb. (transitive) To drop something that was intended to be caught.
SPILL, verb. To mar; to damage; to destroy by misuse; to waste.
SPILL, verb. (obsolete) To be destroyed, ruined, or wasted; to come to ruin; to perish; to waste.
SPILL, verb. To cause to flow out and be lost or wasted; to shed.
SPILL, verb. To cover or decorate with slender pieces of wood, metal, ivory, etc.; to inlay.
SPILL, verb. (nautical) To relieve a sail from the pressure of the wind, so that it can be more easily reefed or furled, or to lessen the strain.
SPILL, noun. (countable) A mess of something that has been dropped.
SPILL, noun. A fall or stumble.
SPILL, noun. A small stick or piece of paper used to light a candle, cigarette etc by the transfer of a flame from a fire.
SPILL, noun. A slender piece of anything.
SPILL, noun. A peg or pin for plugging a hole, as in a cask; a spile.
SPILL, noun. A metallic rod or pin.
SPILL, noun. (mining) One of the thick laths or poles driven horizontally ahead of the main timbering in advancing a level in loose ground.
SPILL, noun. (sound recording) The situation where sound is picked up by a microphone from a source other than that which is intended.
SPILL, noun. (obsolete) A small sum of money.
SPILL, noun. (Australia) (politics) A declaration that the leadership of a parliamentary party is vacant, and open for re-election. Short form of leadership spill
SPILL BLOOD, verb. (transitive) To injure; to kill
SPILL BLOOD, verb. (intransitive) to bleed, to lose blood because of an injury.
SPILL INK, verb. To write, especially professionally.
SPILL KIT, noun. A compilation of absorbent materials, cleaners, and chemical neutralisers - used to contain accidental spills in an industrial setting.
SPILL ONE'S GUTS, verb. (slang) (idiomatic) To confess, or to divulge secrets, typically speaking freely and at length after a change of motive or an incentive.
SPILL ONE'S GUTS, verb. (slang) (idiomatic) To vomit.
SPILL ONE'S SEED, verb. (idiomatic) (euphemistic) (of a man) To masturbate or to ejaculate when the penis has been withdrawn from one's partner.
SPILL OUT, verb. Used other than as an idiom: see to spill out.
SPILL OUT, verb. (intransitive) (said of people) to exit (outside) in large quantities
SPILL OUT, verb. (intransitive) (said of emotions or feelings) to be released without constraint
SPILL OVER, verb. To enter into another zone by way of accident or overcrowding; to overflow.
SPILL OVER, verb. (intransitive) Of an infectious disease, to spread from one species of animal to another and particularly to humans.
SPILL THE BEANS, verb. (idiomatic) (intransitive) To reveal a secret; to disclose.
SPILL THE TEA, verb. (idiomatic) (informal) To disclose information, especially of a sensitive nature.

Dictionary definition

SPILL, noun. Liquid that is spilled; "clean up the spills".
SPILL, noun. A channel that carries excess water over or around a dam or other obstruction.
SPILL, noun. The act of allowing a fluid to escape.
SPILL, noun. A sudden drop from an upright position; "he had a nasty spill on the ice".
SPILL, verb. Cause or allow (a liquid substance) to run or flow from a container; "spill the milk"; "splatter water".
SPILL, verb. Flow, run or fall out and become lost; "The milk spilled across the floor"; "The wine spilled onto the table".
SPILL, verb. Cause or allow (a solid substance) to flow or run out or over; "spill the beans all over the table".
SPILL, verb. Pour out in drops or small quantities or as if in drops or small quantities; "shed tears"; "spill blood"; "God shed His grace on Thee".
SPILL, verb. Reveal information; "If you don't oblige me, I'll talk!"; "The former employee spilled all the details".
SPILL, verb. Reduce the pressure of wind on (a sail).

Wise words

We cannot always control our thoughts, but we can control our words, and repetition impresses the subconscious, and we are then master of the situation.
Florence Scovel Shinn