Associations to the word «Good»

Wiktionary

GOOD, adjective. (heading) Of people.
GOOD, adjective. Acting in the interest of good; ethical.
GOOD, adjective. Competent or talented.
GOOD, adjective. Able to be depended on for the discharge of obligations incurred; of unimpaired credit.
GOOD, adjective. Satisfied or at ease
GOOD, adjective. (of capabilities)
GOOD, adjective. Useful for a particular purpose; functional.
GOOD, adjective. Effective.
GOOD, adjective. (obsolete) Real; actual; serious.
GOOD, adjective. (heading) Of properties and qualities.
GOOD, adjective. (of food)
GOOD, adjective. Edible; not stale or rotten.
GOOD, adjective. Having a particularly pleasant taste.
GOOD, adjective. Being satisfying; meeting dietary requirements.
GOOD, adjective. Healthful.
GOOD, adjective. Pleasant; enjoyable.
GOOD, adjective. Favourable.
GOOD, adjective. Beneficial; worthwhile.
GOOD, adjective. Adequate; sufficient; not fallacious.
GOOD, adjective. (colloquial) With "and", extremely.
GOOD, adjective. (especially when capitalized) Holy.
GOOD, adjective. (heading) Of quantities.
GOOD, adjective. Reasonable in amount.
GOOD, adjective. Large in amount or size.
GOOD, adjective. Entire.
GOOD, interjection. That is good; an elliptical exclamation of satisfaction or commendation.
GOOD, adverb. (nonstandard) Well; satisfactorily or thoroughly.
GOOD, noun. (uncountable) The forces or behaviors that are the enemy of evil. Usually consists of helping others and general benevolence.
GOOD, noun. (countable) A result that is positive in the view of the speaker.
GOOD, noun. (uncountable) The abstract instantiation of goodness; that which possesses desirable qualities, promotes success, welfare, or happiness, is serviceable, fit, excellent, kind, benevolent, etc.
GOOD, noun. (countable) (usually in plural) An item of merchandise.
GOOD, verb. (intransitive) (now chiefly dialectal) To thrive; fatten; prosper; improve.
GOOD, verb. (transitive) (now chiefly dialectal) To make good; turn to good; improve.
GOOD, verb. (intransitive) (now chiefly dialectal) To make improvements or repairs.
GOOD, verb. (intransitive) (now chiefly dialectal) To benefit; gain.
GOOD, verb. (transitive) (now chiefly dialectal) To do good to (someone); benefit; cause to improve or gain.
GOOD, verb. (transitive) (now chiefly dialectal) To satisfy; indulge; gratify.
GOOD, verb. (reflexive) (now chiefly dialectal) To flatter; congratulate oneself; anticipate.
GOOD, verb. (transitive) (now chiefly dialectal) (Scotland) To furnish with dung; manure; fatten with manure; fertilise.
GOOD, proper noun. A surname​.
GOOD, proper noun. An unincorporated community in West Virginia
GOOD AFTANOON, interjection. Eye dialect spelling of good afternoon.
GOOD AND, adverb. (idiomatic) (used as an intensifier) Very; exceptionally; utterly.
GOOD AS GOLD, adjective. (of an asset) Of enduring value.
GOOD AS GOLD, adjective. (UK) (of a person) Very well-behaved.
GOOD AS ONE'S WORD, adjective. (idiomatic) Faithful to a promise one has made.
GOOD BISHOP, noun. (chess) A bishop that has high mobility.
GOOD BISHOPS, noun. Plural of good bishop
GOOD BOOK, noun. The Christian Bible.
GOOD BOOKS, noun. (idiomatic) Favorable regard; personal approval; kindly treatment.
GOOD BYE, interjection. Alternative form of goodbye
GOOD COP BAD COP, noun. A psychological tactic used for interrogation, originally involving a police officer playing the role of adversary, and another that of friend.
GOOD DRUNK, noun. (idiomatic) A person who is cheerful and companionable when intoxicated, retaining reasonable control of his or her mental and emotional faculties.
GOOD EGG, noun. (idiomatic) A good person, someone to be trusted; a friend.
GOOD ENDING, noun. (video games) An ending that occurs when the player finishes a video game and is completely successful, as opposed to a bad ending.
GOOD ENDINGS, noun. Plural of good ending
GOOD ENOUGH FOR JAZZ, adjective. (idiomatic) (informal) Good enough.
GOOD ENOUGH TO EAT, adjective. (idiomatic) Supremely beautiful; aesthetically pleasing.
GOOD EVENING, noun. Used as a greeting in the evening.
GOOD FAITH, noun. Good, honest intentions, even if producing unfortunate results.
GOOD FAITH, adjective. Having or done with good, honest intentions; well-intentioned.
GOOD FAITH, adjective. Presuming that all parties to a discussion are honest and intend to act in a fair and appropriate manner.
GOOD FOLK, noun. (colloquial) (UK) Fairies, brownies, pixies, etc.
GOOD FOR NOTHING, adjective. (idiomatic) useless; worthless
GOOD FOR YOU, adjective. Healthy
GOOD FOR YOU, interjection. An exclamation of encouragement or congratulation.
GOOD FORM, noun. (chiefly UK) Behavior that is both morally and socially correct; proper manner, decorum or etiquette.
GOOD FORTUNE, noun. Good luck
GOOD FRIDAY, proper noun. The Friday before Easter Sunday, the commemoration of the day on which Christ was crucified.
GOOD FRIDAYS, noun. Plural of Good Friday
GOOD GOD, interjection. (idiomatic) (UK) (US) (mildly blasphemous) (dated) (Canada) Expression of surprise, outrage, or horror.
GOOD GODDESS, interjection. Synonym of good God.
GOOD GOING, interjection. Well done; congratulations!
GOOD GOLLY, interjection. (slang) expression of surprise, etc.; golly
GOOD GRACES, noun. (idiomatic) Favorable regard; personal approval; kindly treatment.
GOOD GRACIOUS, interjection. (idiomatic) (euphemistic) (dated) Oh my God.
GOOD GRAVY, interjection. Used to express surprise or anger without a hint of profanity.
GOOD GRIEF, interjection. An expression of surprise or shock.
GOOD GRIEF, interjection. An expression of dismay and disgust.
GOOD GUY, noun. (informal) a hero
GOOD GUY, noun. (informal) an all-around pleasant person; usually used in reference to a male.
GOOD GUYS, noun. Plural of good guy
GOOD HEAVENS, interjection. (dated) (exclamation) An exclamation of surprise or shock.
GOOD HIDING, noun. A severe thrashing or beating
GOOD HOUSE, noun. An inn or bar
GOOD HUMOR, noun. US spelling of good humour
GOOD HUMOUR, noun. A pleasant disposition or mood.
GOOD JOB, interjection. (idiomatic) well done; congratulations!
GOOD JOB, noun. Used other than as an idiom: see good,‎ job.
GOOD JOB, noun. (idiomatic) (British) a good thing.
GOOD JOBS, noun. Plural of good job
GOOD KING HENRY, noun. A species of goosefoot, Chenopodium bonus-henricus, native to Britain and much of Europe, cultivated as a vegetable.
GOOD LEG, noun. (nautical) A course sailed on a tack which is near the desired course.
GOOD LENGTH, noun. (cricket) The area on a pitch considered to be the best place to pitch the ball in order to either get the batsman out, or restrict him from scoring; the length at which the ball bounces just too far away for it to be comfortably played either on the front foot or the back foot.
GOOD LENGTH, adjective. (cricket) Describing a ball so pitched
GOOD LICK, noun. (colloquial) Something useful; a good deed.
GOOD LOOKING, adjective. Alternative spelling of good-looking
GOOD LORD, interjection. An exclamation of amazement or disapproval.
GOOD LUCK, interjection. A phrase said to wish fortune on someone or as encouragement.
GOOD LUCK, noun. Desirable or beneficial fortune.
GOOD MANNERS, noun. The treatment of other people with courtesy and politeness, and showing correct public behaviour.
GOOD MORNING, interjection. Used as a greeting when meeting somebody for the first time in the morning..
GOOD MORNING, interjection. (by extension) (humorous) used to greet someone who has just awakened (irrespective of the time of day).
GOOD MORNING, interjection. (by extension) (informal) Said to someone who has come to a belated realization.
GOOD MORNING, interjection. A greeting said when parting from someone in the morning.
GOOD MORNING, noun. An exercise performed by bending forward at the waist and then returning to a standing posture, while bearing a barbell across the shoulders.
GOOD MORNINGS, noun. Plural of good morning
GOOD MORROW, interjection. (archaic) good morning
GOOD NAME, noun. (law) Credit, honour, regard, reputation.
GOOD NATURE, noun. Habitual kindness or mildness of temper or disposition; amiability.
GOOD NEWS, noun. Something or someone pleasant, fortunate, or otherwise positive.
GOOD NEWS, noun. ​(Christianity) The message of Jesus concerning the salvation of the faithful (as elaborated in the Gospels)
GOOD NOW, interjection. (obsolete) An exclamation of wonder, surprise, or entreaty.
GOOD OFFICES, noun. The beneficial services and acts of a third party; especially when used to mediate between people in a dispute
GOOD OL', adjective. Eye dialect spelling of good old.
GOOD OL' BOY, noun. Alternative form of good old boy
GOOD OL' BOYS, noun. Plural of good ol' boy Alternative form of good old boys
GOOD OLD, adjective. Reliable; typical; consistently good.
GOOD OLD BOY, noun. (idiomatic) A male friend or chum, especially a schoolmate; a man with an established network of friends who assist one another in social and business situations; a decent, dependable fellow.
GOOD OLD BOY, noun. (idiomatic) (chiefly southern US) (sometimes derogatory) A friendly, unambitious, relatively uneducated, sometimes racially biased white man who embodies the stereotype of the folksy culture of the rural southern USA.
GOOD OLD BOY NETWORK, noun. Alternative form of old boy network
GOOD OLD BOY NETWORKS, noun. Plural of good old boy network
GOOD OLD BOYS, noun. Plural of good old boy
GOOD OLE, adjective. Eye dialect spelling of good old.
GOOD OLE BOY, noun. Alternative form of good old boy
GOOD OLE BOYS, noun. Plural of good ole boy Alternative form of good old boys
GOOD ON YOU, interjection. (New England) (UK) (Ireland) (Australia) (New Zealand) Well done; an exclamation of encouragement or congratulation.
GOOD PEOPLE, noun. (slang) A good person.
GOOD RIDDANCE, interjection. (idiomatic) Used to indicate that a departure, or loss is welcome.
GOOD RIDDANCE TO BAD RUBBISH, noun. A welcome departure.
GOOD SAMARITAN, noun. (biblical) The subject of a particular New Testament parable.
GOOD SAMARITAN, noun. A person who gives help or sympathy to someone in distress.
GOOD SAMARITAN LAW, noun. (legal) A law that exempts from legal liability a person who attempts to give reasonable aid to another person who is injured, ill, or otherwise imperiled.
GOOD SAMARITAN LAW, noun. (legal) A law that requires able persons, without putting themselves at risk, to provide reasonable aid to persons who are injured, ill, or otherwise imperiled.
GOOD SAMARITAN LAWS, noun. Plural of Good Samaritan law
GOOD SAMARITANS, noun. Plural of Good Samaritan
GOOD SENSE, noun. Common sense.
GOOD SHIT, noun. (informal) (colloquial) Something or someone likeable.
GOOD SHOW, interjection. An exclamation of praise or endorsement of an achievement.
GOOD SPIRITS, noun. A good, cheerful mood.
GOOD SPORT, noun. Someone who exhibits polite behaviour even or especially when things go wrong
GOOD SPORT, noun. Someone who can take a joke
GOOD STANDING, noun. The status of a member of a profession who is not suspended or disbarred, and is registered with a proper authority and has paid any registration fees
GOOD STANDING, noun. (by extension) The status of a person who is known to be of good character and to be trustworthy
GOOD THING, noun. Something that is conventionally accepted as good beyond doubt.
GOOD TIME, noun. A period of time spent at some pleasant, enjoyable or entertaining activity.
GOOD TIME CHARLEY, noun. Alternative form of good-time Charlie
GOOD TIME CHARLIE, noun. Alternative form of good-time Charlie
GOOD TIME GIRL, noun. Alternative form of good-time girl
GOOD TIMES, noun. Plural of good time
GOOD TIMES, noun. A period of prosperity or happiness.
GOOD TO GO, adjective. (idiomatic) (of a thing) Ready for use or ready for normal operation, especially after repair or renewal.
GOOD TO GO, adjective. (idiomatic) (of a person) Ready for some specific task or ready for normal activity, especially after preparation or recovery.
GOOD TURN, noun. (idiomatic) A good deed; a thoughtful or selfless act.
GOOD TURNS, noun. Plural of good turn
GOOD VALUE, adjective. Used other than as an idiom: see good,‎ value.
GOOD VALUE, adjective. (UK) (Australia) (idiomatic) (slang) Friendly; easy-going.
GOOD VALUE, adjective. (UK) (Australia) (idiomatic) (slang) Funny; witty.
GOOD WORD, noun. Used other than as an idiom: see good,‎ word.
GOOD WORD, noun. Positive recommendation.
GOOD WORD, noun. News, recent events, especially of a positive nature
GOOD WORD, noun. A holy promise or teaching.
GOOD WORD, noun. The Bible, especially the New Testament.
GOOD WORKS, noun. (Christianity) A person's beneficent actions or deeds, especially those of a charitable nature which advance one's progress toward salvation.

Dictionary definition

GOOD, noun. Benefit; "for your own good"; "what's the good of worrying?".
GOOD, noun. Moral excellence or admirableness; "there is much good to be found in people".
GOOD, noun. That which is pleasing or valuable or useful; "weigh the good against the bad"; "among the highest goods of all are happiness and self-realization".
GOOD, noun. Articles of commerce.
GOOD, adverb. (often used as a combining form) in a good or proper or satisfactory manner or to a high standard (`good' is a nonstandard dialectal variant for `well'); "the children behaved well"; "a task well done"; "the party went well"; "he slept well"; "a well-argued thesis"; "a well-seasoned dish"; "a well-planned party"; "the baby can walk pretty good".
GOOD, adverb. Completely and absolutely (`good' is sometimes used informally for `thoroughly'); "he was soundly defeated"; "we beat him good".
GOOD, adjective. Having desirable or positive qualities especially those suitable for a thing specified; "good news from the hospital"; "a good report card"; "when she was good she was very very good"; "a good knife is one good for cutting"; "this stump will make a good picnic table"; "a good check"; "a good joke"; "a good exterior paint"; "a good secretary"; "a good dress for the office".
GOOD, adjective. Having the normally expected amount; "gives full measure"; "gives good measure"; "a good mile from here".
GOOD, adjective. Morally admirable.
GOOD, adjective. Deserving of esteem and respect; "all respectable companies give guarantees"; "ruined the family's good name".
GOOD, adjective. Promoting or enhancing well-being; "an arms limitation agreement beneficial to all countries"; "the beneficial effects of a temperate climate"; "the experience was good for her".
GOOD, adjective. Agreeable or pleasing; "we all had a good time"; "good manners".
GOOD, adjective. Of moral excellence; "a genuinely good person"; "a just cause"; "an upright and respectable man".
GOOD, adjective. Having or showing knowledge and skill and aptitude; "adept in handicrafts"; "an adept juggler"; "an expert job"; "a good mechanic"; "a practiced marksman"; "a proficient engineer"; "a lesser-known but no less skillful composer"; "the effect was achieved by skillful retouching".
GOOD, adjective. Thorough; "had a good workout"; "gave the house a good cleaning".
GOOD, adjective. With or in a close or intimate relationship; "a good friend"; "my sisters and brothers are near and dear".
GOOD, adjective. Financially sound; "a good investment"; "a secure investment".
GOOD, adjective. Most suitable or right for a particular purpose; "a good time to plant tomatoes"; "the right time to act"; "the time is ripe for great sociological changes".
GOOD, adjective. Resulting favorably; "it's a good thing that I wasn't there"; "it is good that you stayed"; "it is well that no one saw you"; "all's well that ends well".
GOOD, adjective. Exerting force or influence; "the law is effective immediately"; "a warranty good for two years"; "the law is already in effect (or in force)".
GOOD, adjective. Capable of pleasing; "good looks".
GOOD, adjective. Appealing to the mind; "good music"; "a serious book".
GOOD, adjective. In excellent physical condition; "good teeth"; "I still have one good leg"; "a sound mind in a sound body".
GOOD, adjective. Tending to promote physical well-being; beneficial to health; "beneficial effects of a balanced diet"; "a good night's sleep"; "the salutary influence of pure air".
GOOD, adjective. Not forged; "a good dollar bill".
GOOD, adjective. Not left to spoil; "the meat is still good".
GOOD, adjective. Generally admired; "good taste".

Wise words

Suit the action to the word, the word to the action.
William Shakespeare