Associations to the word «Dear»

Wiktionary

DEAR, adjective. Loved; lovable.
DEAR, adjective. Loving, affectionate, heartfelt
DEAR, adjective. Precious to or greatly valued by someone.
DEAR, adjective. High in price; expensive.
DEAR, adjective. A formal way to start (possibly after my) addressing somebody at the beginning of a letter, memo etc.
DEAR, adjective. A formal way to start (often after my) addressing somebody one likes or regards kindly.
DEAR, adjective. An ironic way to start (often after my) addressing an inferior.
DEAR, adjective. (obsolete) Noble.
DEAR, noun. A very kind, loving person.
DEAR, noun. A beloved person
DEAR, verb. (obsolete) To endear.
DEAR, adverb. (obsolete) dearly; at a high price
DEAR, adjective. Severe(ly affected), sore
DEAR HEART, noun. Term of affection; sweetheart.
DEAR HEARTS, noun. Plural of dear heart
DEAR JOHN LETTER, noun. A letter from a wife or girlfriend to her husband or boyfriend, informing that the relationship is over. Usually precipitated by the writer's having met a third party.
DEAR JOHN LETTERS, noun. Plural of Dear John letter
DEAR LORD, interjection. Expressing strong emotion, such as teariness or frustration.
DEAR ME, interjection. An expression of surprise, dismay, or indulgent disapproval.
DEAR SIR, noun. Used at the beginning of a formal letter when addressing persons of unknown names.
DEAR SIRS, noun. Plural of dear sir

Dictionary definition

DEAR, noun. A beloved person; used as terms of endearment.
DEAR, noun. A sweet innocent mild-mannered person (especially a child).
DEAR, adverb. With affection; "she loved him dearly"; "he treats her affectionately".
DEAR, adverb. At a great cost; "he paid dearly for the food"; "this cost him dear".
DEAR, adjective. Dearly loved.
DEAR, adjective. With or in a close or intimate relationship; "a good friend"; "my sisters and brothers are near and dear".
DEAR, adjective. Earnest; "one's dearest wish"; "devout wishes for their success"; "heartfelt condolences".
DEAR, adjective. Having a high price; "costly jewelry"; "high-priced merchandise"; "much too dear for my pocketbook"; "a pricey restaurant".

Wise words

We should have a great fewer disputes in the world if words were taken for what they are, the signs of our ideas only, and not for things themselves.
John Locke