Associations to the word «Had»

Wiktionary

HAVE, verb. (transitive) To possess, own, hold.
HAVE, verb. (transitive) To be related in some way to (with the object identifying the relationship).
HAVE, verb. (transitive) To partake of a particular substance (especially a food or drink) or action.
HAVE, verb. (auxiliary verb, taking a past participle) Used in forming the perfect aspect and the past perfect aspect.
HAVE, verb. (auxiliary verb, taking a to-infinitive) must.
HAVE, verb. (transitive) To give birth to.
HAVE, verb. (transitive) To engage in sexual intercourse with.
HAVE, verb. (transitive) To accept as a romantic partner.
HAVE, verb. (transitive with bare infinitive) To cause to, by a command, request or invitation.
HAVE, verb. (transitive with adjective or adjective-phrase complement) To cause to be.
HAVE, verb. (transitive with bare infinitive) To be affected by an occurrence. (Used in supplying a topic that is not a verb argument.)
HAVE, verb. (transitive with adjective or adjective-phrase complement) To depict as being.
HAVE, verb. Used as interrogative auxiliary verb with a following pronoun to form tag questions. (For further discussion, see "Usage notes" below)
HAVE, verb. (British) (slang) To defeat in a fight; take.
HAVE, verb. (Irish) To be able to speak a language.
HAVE, verb. To feel or be (especially painfully) aware of.
HAVE, verb. To be afflicted with, to suffer from, to experience something negative
HAVE, verb. To trick, to deceive
HAVE, verb. (transitive) (often with present participle) To allow.
HAVE A BALL, verb. (idiomatic) To enjoy thoroughly; to have lots of fun or excitement.
HAVE A BATH, verb. To wash oneself in a bath; to bath
HAVE A BONE IN ONE'S LEG, verb. (British) (informal) Used as a fatuous excuse to avoid doing something
HAVE A BONE TO PICK, verb. (idiomatic) (usually followed by with) To have a complaint or grievance (with somebody); to have a contentious issue to discuss.
HAVE A BREAK, verb. To have a short rest period in one's work or studies, other activities
HAVE A BRICK IN ONE'S HAT, verb. (US) (idiomatic) (obsolete) to be drunk
HAVE A BUN IN THE OVEN, verb. (idiomatic) (euphemistic) To be pregnant; to be expecting a baby.
HAVE A CARE, verb. (dated) (mostly imperative) take care; be on one's guard
HAVE A CLUE, verb. To be knowledgeable about a topic or situation.
HAVE A COUPLE, verb. (idiomatic) To drink enough alcohol to be slightly drunk
HAVE A COW, verb. (idiomatic) To get angry; have a fit.
HAVE A COW, verb. Used other than as an idiom: see have,‎ a,‎ cow.
HAVE A CRACK AT, verb. To attempt (something); to try to do (something).
HAVE A CROW TO PULL, verb. (obsolete) To have a point of contention (with someone); to have a bone to pick.
HAVE A DOG IN THIS FIGHT, verb. To have a personal stake in an issue.
HAVE A FABLE FOR, verb. (idiomatic) To have a weakness for something.
HAVE A FEW, verb. (idiomatic) To drink enough alcohol to be slightly drunk
HAVE A FINGER IN, verb. (informal) To be concerned or involved in.
HAVE A FIT, verb. (idiomatic) To experience an epileptic seizure.
HAVE A FIT, verb. (idiomatic) To become suddenly enraged.
HAVE A FROG IN ONE'S THROAT, verb. (idiomatic) To feel the need to cough; to have a tickle in one's throat; to have a scratchy or uneven voice.
HAVE A GO, verb. (intransitive) (informal) To make an attempt; to try.
HAVE A GO, verb. (intransitive) (informal) (idiomatic) (UK) To attack (physically).
HAVE A GO, verb. (intransitive) (informal) (idiomatic) (UK) To tell off (especially unnecessarily or excessively), to criticise.
HAVE A GOOD ONE, verb. (idiomatic) To enjoy an event or occasion, especially a holiday or one's birthday.
HAVE A GOOD ONE, verb. Formula used when parting.
HAVE A GOOD TIME, verb. (idiomatic) To enjoy oneself.
HAVE A HANDLE ON, verb. (idiomatic) To understand or grasp.
HAVE A HANDLE ON, verb. (idiomatic) To be in control of, to have power over.
HAVE A HARD-ON FOR, verb. (US) (slang) To have an irrational, or abnormal fixation or preoccupation with; to have a fetish (sense 3) for.
HAVE A HEAD FOR, verb. (transitive) (idiomatic) to be capable with, to be knowledgeable about
HAVE A HEART, verb. (idiomatic) To be kind or sympathetic; to treat others kindly.
HAVE A LAUGH, verb. To laugh
HAVE A LAUGH, verb. (UK) (idiomatic) To joke; kid around.
HAVE A LAUGH, verb. (UK) (idiomatic) To enjoy oneself; have fun.
HAVE A LOOK, verb. To examine, to observe
HAVE A LOOK-SEE, verb. (British) (informal) (idiomatic) Take a look.
HAVE A MIND LIKE A SIEVE, verb. (simile) To have a poor memory; to have difficulty remembering things.
HAVE A MIND OF ONE'S OWN, verb. (idiomatic) To form one's personal opinions and choose one's actions without being governed by the views or choices of others; to be independently minded; to think for oneself.
HAVE A MOUNTAIN TO CLIMB, verb. (idiomatic) To be faced with a difficult task or challenge.
HAVE A NAP, verb. Alternative form of take a nap
HAVE A PAIR, verb. (chiefly US) (idiomatic) (indelicate) To be manly.
HAVE A POP AT, verb. (UK) (slang) (transitive) To attack or start a fight with something or someone.
HAVE A QUIET WORD, verb. To speak to someone in private.
HAVE A QUIET WORD, verb. When you get a moment I'd like to have a quiet word.
HAVE A SAY, verb. (idiom) To voice one's opinion
HAVE A SCREW LOOSE, verb. (idiomatic) To be insane or irrational.
HAVE A SEAT, verb. To sit down; to take a seat.
HAVE A SEAT, verb. (idiomatic) A polite directive to sit down
HAVE A SNOOTFUL, verb. (idiomatic) To be drunk.
HAVE A STAB, verb. (idiomatic) To make an attempt, a try.
HAVE A THING, verb. (idiomatic) to be in a casual relationship.
HAVE A THING, verb. (idiomatic) (usually with for) to have a crush, or a soft spot for someone.
HAVE A TIGER BY THE TAIL, verb. (idiomatic) To be in a difficult or dangerous situation in which one ideally should not remain, but from which one cannot withdraw.
HAVE A WANK, verb. (vulgar) (usually of a man) to masturbate
HAVE A WAY WITH, verb. (idiomatic) To be skilled, adept, or graceful in something.
HAVE A WHALE OF A TIME, verb. (idiomatic) To enjoy oneself greatly.
HAVE A WORD, verb. (idiomatic) To speak to someone in private, often with a negative implication.
HAVE A WORD IN SOMEONE'S EAR, verb. To speak to someone in private.
HAVE A WORD IN SOMEONE'S EAR, verb. When you get a moment I'd like to have a word in your ear.
HAVE A WORD WITH ONESELF, verb. (idiom) To think about one's attitudes or behaviour with a view to reform.
HAVE AN AFFAIR, verb. To be having extramarital sex while married.
HAVE AN EYE FOR, verb. (idiomatic) To have good taste; to have the ability to discriminate or identify quality.
HAVE ANOTHER THING COMING, verb. Alternative form of have another think coming
HAVE ANOTHER THINK, verb. To reflect on a frustrating or disappointing event; to reframe such an event.
HAVE ANOTHER THINK COMING, verb. To be deluded, to be mistaken; to need to rethink something one has determined; to need to reconsider one's plans or expectations.
HAVE ANOTHER THOUGHT COMING, verb. Alternative form of have another think coming
HAVE AT, verb. (transitive) (idiomatic) (archaic) to attack; to engage in combat with
HAVE AT YOU, interjection. (dated) An exclamation indicating that one is about to strike the person addressed, typically with a sword or other hand-held weapon.
HAVE BATS IN ONE'S BELFRY, verb. (idiomatic) (intransitive) To be crazy or eccentric.
HAVE BEEN AROUND, verb. (idiomatic) To be experienced in worldly matters; to be seasoned, not naive.
HAVE BEEN AROUND THE BLOCK, verb. Alternative form of have been around
HAVE BEEN IN THE WARS, verb. (UK) (Australian) (humorous) To have been seriously hurt, or greatly damaged.
HAVE BUTTERFLIES IN ONE'S STOMACH, verb. To experience a certain "fluttery" physical sensation in the abdomen, associated with nervousness, uncertainty, or anxiety. Often associated with love.
HAVE BUTTERFLIES IN ONE'S STOMACH, verb. (idiomatic) To be nervous, uncertain, or anxious.
HAVE DONE, verb. (intransitive) To reach an end.
HAVE DONE WITH, verb. (transitive) To finish.
HAVE DONE WITH, verb. (transitive) To end relations with.
HAVE EGG ON ONE'S FACE, verb. (idiomatic) To suffer embarrassment or humiliation; to damage one's reputation.
HAVE EYES BIGGER THAN ONE'S BELLY, verb. (idiomatic) (British) (uncommon) To take more food on one's plate than one can eat; to be greedy.
HAVE EYES BIGGER THAN ONE'S STOMACH, verb. (idiomatic) To take more food on one's plate than one can eat; to be greedy.
HAVE EYES BIGGER THAN ONE'S STOMACH, verb. (idiomatic) To want more than one can handle.
HAVE EYES FOR, verb. (transitive) (idiomatic) To be romantically interested in [someone].
HAVE EYES IN THE BACK OF ONE'S HEAD, verb. (idiomatic) To be particularly, especially uncannily, observant; a perceived ability to see in all directions at once.
HAVE FUN, interjection. Used to wish somebody a good and enjoyable time when they're about to do something.
HAVE FUN, verb. To enjoy oneself.
HAVE FUN, verb. (Can we verify([1]) this sense?) To attract opposite sex attention.
HAVE GOT, verb. (modal) (idiomatic) (with infinitive) To be obliged or obligated.
HAVE GOT, verb. (modal) (with infinitive) Used to express necessity or a high degree of certainty
HAVE GOT, verb. (transitive) (idiomatic) () To have, own or possess.
HAVE GOT, verb. (transitive) (idiomatic) To have (a future engagement).
HAVE GOT SOMEONE'S BACK, verb. To be prepared and willing to support or defend (someone).
HAVE HAD IT, verb. (idiomatic) To have endured all that one can.
HAVE HAD IT UP TO HERE, verb. (idiomatic) To have become very frustrated or angry; to have reached the limit of one's patience or forbearance.
HAVE HAD ONE'S CHIPS, verb. (idiomatic) To be dead or finished.
HAVE HAD ONE'S DAY, verb. Alternative form of have seen one's day
HAVE IN, verb. (transitive) To allow in; grant permission or admittance to; invite in or over; admit.
HAVE IN MIND, verb. (transitive) (idiomatic) To consider, to contemplate, to intend.
HAVE IT, verb. To understand or believe
HAVE IT, verb. To have died
HAVE IT, verb. To be beyond repair
HAVE IT BOTH WAYS, verb. (idiomatic) To have two things which are mutually incompatible.
HAVE IT COMING, verb. (idiomatic) To deserve or merit, as the consequences of one's actions.
HAVE IT EASY, verb. (idiomatic) (intransitive) To have favourable conditions for an easy life.
HAVE IT GOING ON, verb. To instigate, observe, or allow an event to continue.
HAVE IT GOING ON, verb. (idiomatic) (chiefly African American Vernacular English) To be attractive or socially successful or have an aura of success.
HAVE IT IN FOR, verb. (transitive) (idiomatic) To be very angry at; to have a grudge against; to have little tolerance for.
HAVE IT LARGE, verb. (idiomatic) To engage intensely in pleasure-seeking activities
HAVE IT MADE, verb. (idiomatic) To have accomplished all there is to do; to have no further work or difficulty; to have achieved a lifestyle characterized by good fortune and comfort.
HAVE IT OFF, verb. (idiomatic) to engage in sexual intercourse
HAVE IT OUT WITH, verb. (idiom) to confront someone
HAVE IT YOUR WAY, interjection. (idiomatic) Do something the way you want to, but be prepared for the consequences.
HAVE KITTENS, verb. (idiomatic) To become extremely upset.
HAVE LEGS, verb. (idiomatic) To have endurance; to have prospects to exist or go on for a long time.
HAVE LEGS, verb. (nautical) To have speed.
HAVE MARITAL RELATIONS, verb. To have sex.
HAVE MERCY, verb. To show mercy or compassion; to stop inflicting punishment or a barrage.
HAVE MORE CHINS THAN A CHINESE PHONE BOOK, verb. (humorous) To be exceedingly fat, especially under the chin (as in a "double chin").
HAVE NOT, noun. Singular variant of have nots.
HAVE NOTS, noun. The poor or underprivileged, contrasted to those who have possessions, power or wealth: the haves.
HAVE ON, verb. (UK) (colloquial) (transitive) To trick or deceive deliberately; to play a prank on.
HAVE ON, verb. To wear.
HAVE ONE FOOT IN THE GRAVE, verb. (idiom) To be close to death, to be dying
HAVE ONE FOOT ON A BANANA PEEL, verb. To be at risk of sudden change, unstable
HAVE ONE'S CAKE AND EAT IT TOO, verb. (idiomatic) To seek to have two things which are mutually incompatible (such as eating a piece of cake and yet still possessing that piece for future use).
HAVE ONE'S DUCKS IN A ROW, verb. (idiomatic) To be organized; to have one's affairs in order; specifically, to have a multi-person effort coordinated towards the exact same goal.
HAVE ONE'S EARS LOWERED, verb. (idiomatic) (humorous) (dated) To get a haircut.
HAVE ONE'S EYE ON, verb. (idiomatic) to seek, pursue
HAVE ONE'S FINGER ON THE PULSE, verb. To understand (something) well.
HAVE ONE'S FINGERS IN MANY PIES, verb. (idiomatic) to be involved in many different things.
HAVE ONE'S HAND OUT, verb. (idiomatic) To be requesting benefits, especially if not entitled to them.
HAVE ONE'S HANDS FULL, verb. ​(idiomatic) To be busy or thoroughly preoccupied.
HAVE ONE'S HANDS TIED, verb. To be powerless to act, to be thwarted.
HAVE ONE'S HEAD READ, verb. (dated) To have the bumps, indentations, and shape of one's skull examined and interpreted by a phrenologist.
HAVE ONE'S HEAD READ, verb. (idiomatic) To have one's mental health assessed, to receive a psychiatric examination.
HAVE ONE'S HEAD SCREWED ON, verb. (colloquial) To be a sensible thinker capable of making sound decisions.
HAVE ONE'S HEAD SCREWED ON RIGHT, verb. Alternative form of have one's head screwed on
HAVE ONE'S HEAD SCREWED ON STRAIGHT, verb. Alternative form of have one's head screwed on
HAVE ONE'S HEAD SCREWED ON THE RIGHT WAY, verb. Alternative form of have one's head screwed on
HAVE ONE'S HEART IN THE RIGHT PLACE, verb. (idiomatic) To have good intentions.
HAVE ONE'S HEART SET ON, verb. Alternative form of set one's heart on
HAVE ONE'S HEART SET UPON, verb. Alternative form of set one's heart on
HAVE ONE'S MONEY'S WORTH, verb. Alternative form of get one's money's worth
HAVE ONE'S NAME ON, verb. Used other than as an idiom: see have,‎ one's,‎ name,‎ on.
HAVE ONE'S NAME ON, verb. To be reserved for someone
HAVE ONE'S NAME ON, verb. To be (in) one's destiny.
HAVE ONE'S NAME TAKEN, verb. (idiomatic) (sports) To receive a yellow card
HAVE ONE'S NUMBER ON IT, verb. (idiomatic) Te be destined for someone.
HAVE ONE'S TAIL UP, verb. To be confident, spirited
HAVE ONE'S TUBES TIED, verb. (idionatic) (colloquial) (medicine) To undergo a tubal ligation.
HAVE ONE'S WAY, verb. (idiomatic) (of a person) To obtain the circumstances one wishes for; to do what one wishes to do, or to have others do what one wishes them to do.
HAVE ONE'S WAY, verb. (idiomatic) To achieve a desired or natural result.
HAVE ONE'S WAY, verb. (euphemistic) (followed by with) To have sexual intercourse with, especially without the consent of one's partner.
HAVE ONE'S WAY WITH, verb. (idiomatic) (euphemistic) To engage in sexual intercourse with, especially without the consent of one's partner.
HAVE ONE'S WEETABIX, verb. (UK) (Ireland) To prepare to exhibit plenty of vitality or strength or other superior performance.
HAVE ONE'S WICKED WAY, verb. (intransitive) (idiomatic) To have sexual intercourse.
HAVE ONE'S WITS ABOUT ONE, verb. (idiomatic) To remain calm, composed, focused, or aware.
HAVE ONE'S WORK CUT OUT FOR ONE, verb. (idiomatic) To face a large task or project.
HAVE OTHER FISH TO FRY, verb. (idiomatic) To have more important things to do.
HAVE REASON, verb. (obsolete) To be right. [15th-18th c.]
HAVE REASON, verb. To have grounds, justification etc. (to do something, or for something).
HAVE SECOND THOUGHTS, verb. (idiomatic) To change one's opinion, or be uneasy about a previous decision.
HAVE SEEN BETTER DAYS, verb. (euphemistic) (of a person or thing) To be in poor condition, to be worn-out.
HAVE SEEN ONE'S DAY, verb. (idiomatic) (of persons, things, ideas, etc.) To be at the point in a life cycle or career of no longer being useful or effective; to be worn-out.
HAVE SEX, verb. To engage in sexual intercourse or any other sexual act.
HAVE SEXUAL RELATIONS, verb. To have sex.
HAVE SOMEONE BY THE BALLS, verb. (idiomatic) (vulgar) To exercise total control over someone.
HAVE SOMEONE BY THE SHORT AND CURLIES, verb. (idiomatic) (colloquial) to exercise total control over someone.
HAVE SOMEONE BY THE SHORT HAIRS, verb. (idiomatic) To have someone in a difficult situation in which he or she is without alternatives and can be controlled.
HAVE SOMEONE GOING, verb. Used other than as an idiom: see See have, go.
HAVE SOMEONE GOING, verb. (colloquial) To temporarily convince someone of a falsehood.
HAVE SOMEONE GOING, verb. (colloquial) To cause someone to be excited, aroused, or upset.
HAVE SOMEONE ON, verb. (UK) (AU) (NZ) (colloquial) To trick or deceive deliberately; to play a prank.
HAVE SOMEONE'S BACK, verb. (idiomatic) To be prepared and willing to support or defend (someone).
HAVE SOMEONE'S BLOOD ON ONE'S HEAD, verb. (idiomatic) To be responsible for someone's death, pain, or misfortune.
HAVE SOMEONE'S GUTS FOR GARTERS, verb. (idiomatic) (British) To reprimand severely.
HAVE SOMEONE'S HIDE, verb. (idiomatic) To punish or subdue someone.
HAVE SOMEONE'S NUMBER, verb. (idiomatic) To understand a person's character, capabilities, or situation.
HAVE SOMETHING TO EAT, verb. (idiomatic) To eat something.
HAVE THE BISCUIT, verb. (idiomatic) (Canada) To be of no further use; to be near death.
HAVE THE BLUES, verb. (idiomatic) To be depressed, to have a low morale.
HAVE THE FLOOR, verb. (idiomatic) To have permission or time to speak, especially in a formal situation.
HAVE THE GOODS ON, verb. Alternative form of get the goods on
HAVE THE HOTS FOR, verb. (idiomatic) (transitive) To be attracted (sexually or romantically) to (someone).
HAVE THE LAST LAUGH, verb. (idiomatic) To be vindicated; to triumph despite predicted failure; to find success after defeat or setback.
HAVE THE PAINTERS IN, verb. (UK) (slang) (euphemistic) To menstruate.
HAVE THE RUN OF, verb. (set phrase) To have permission or freedom to move around throughout an area or to use something at will.
HAVE THE TIGER BY THE TAIL, verb. (idiomatic) To be in a difficult or dangerous situation in which one ideally should not remain, but from which one cannot withdraw.
HAVE THE TIME, verb. (intransitive) To be available, to have time, to have nothing more important to do.
HAVE THE TIME, verb. (intransitive) To know the current time, or be able to consult a device which does.
HAVE THE TIME OF ONE'S LIFE, verb. (idiomatic) To enjoy oneself immensely, or more than ever before.
HAVE THE WIND UP, verb. (idiomatic) (British) To be frightened or disturbed.
HAVE THE WOLF BY THE EAR, verb. (idiomatic) To be in a difficult situation – a dangerous situation from which one cannot disengage, but in which one cannot safely remain.
HAVE THE WORLD BY THE BAG, verb. Alternative form of have the world by the tail
HAVE THE WORLD BY THE BALLS, verb. Alternative form of have the world by the tail
HAVE THE WORLD BY THE NECK, verb. Alternative form of have the world by the tail
HAVE THE WORLD BY THE NUTS, verb. Alternative form of have the world by the tail
HAVE THE WORLD BY THE TAIL, verb. (idiomatic) To possess great influence and opportunity.
HAVE THE WORLD BY THE TESTICLES, verb. Alternative form of have the world by the tail
HAVE THE WORLD ON A STRING, verb. Alternative form of have the world by the tail
HAVE TICKETS ON ONESELF, verb. (Australia) (New Zealand) (derogatory) To be conceited.
HAVE TIME, verb. (intransitive) To be available, to have the time, to be without commitments over a certain period of time (thus being able to choose what to do with it, instead of following a schedule).
HAVE TO DO WITH THE PRICE OF FISH, verb. (idiomatic) variant of have to do with the price of tea in China
HAVE TRUCK WITH, verb. (idiomatic) to have dealings with; to truck with.
HAVE TWO STRINGS TO ONE'S BOW, verb. To have another means or expedient kept in reserve in case the current one fails.
HAVE UP, verb. (transitive) (idiomatic) (UK) To accuse, arrest, try for a criminal act.
HAVE VAN GOGH'S EAR FOR MUSIC, verb. (humorous) To be tone-deaf.
HAVE WORDS, verb. (idiomatic) (of two or more parties) To argue, to have an argument.
HAVE WORDS, verb. (idiomatic) (of one party) (followed by with) To speak sternly, angrily, or in an argumentative manner to.
HAVE WORK DONE, verb. Used other than as an idiom: see have done,‎ work.
HAVE WORK DONE, verb. (euphemistic) To have plastic surgery performed on oneself, especially, of women, breast reconstruction.
HAVE YOUNG, verb. (intransitive) To birth; bring forth offspring.

Dictionary definition

HAVE, noun. A person who possesses great material wealth.
HAVE, verb. Have or possess, either in a concrete or an abstract sense; "She has $1,000 in the bank"; "He has got two beautiful daughters"; "She holds a Master's degree from Harvard".
HAVE, verb. Have as a feature; "This restaurant features the most famous chefs in France".
HAVE, verb. Go through (mental or physical states or experiences); "get an idea"; "experience vertigo"; "get nauseous"; "receive injuries"; "have a feeling".
HAVE, verb. Have ownership or possession of; "He owns three houses in Florida"; "How many cars does she have?".
HAVE, verb. Cause to move; cause to be in a certain position or condition; "He got his squad on the ball"; "This let me in for a big surprise"; "He got a girl into trouble".
HAVE, verb. Serve oneself to, or consume regularly; "Have another bowl of chicken soup!"; "I don't take sugar in my coffee".
HAVE, verb. Have a personal or business relationship with someone; "have a postdoc"; "have an assistant"; "have a lover".
HAVE, verb. Organize or be responsible for; "hold a reception"; "have, throw, or make a party"; "give a course".
HAVE, verb. Have left; "I have two years left"; "I don't have any money left"; "They have two more years before they retire".
HAVE, verb. Be confronted with; "What do we have here?"; "Now we have a fine mess".
HAVE, verb. Undergo; "The stocks had a fast run-up".
HAVE, verb. Suffer from; be ill with; "She has arthritis".
HAVE, verb. Cause to do; cause to act in a specified manner; "The ads induced me to buy a VCR"; "My children finally got me to buy a computer"; "My wife made me buy a new sofa".
HAVE, verb. Receive willingly something given or offered; "The only girl who would have him was the miller's daughter"; "I won't have this dog in my house!"; "Please accept my present".
HAVE, verb. Get something; come into possession of; "receive payment"; "receive a gift"; "receive letters from the front".
HAVE, verb. Undergo (as of injuries and illnesses); "She suffered a fracture in the accident"; "He had an insulin shock after eating three candy bars"; "She got a bruise on her leg"; "He got his arm broken in the scuffle".
HAVE, verb. Achieve a point or goal; "Nicklaus had a 70"; "The Brazilian team got 4 goals"; "She made 29 points that day".
HAVE, verb. Cause to be born; "My wife had twins yesterday!".
HAVE, verb. Have sex with; archaic use; "He had taken this woman when she was most vulnerable".

Wise words

The right word may be effective, but no word was ever as effective as a rightly timed pause.
Mark Twain