Associations to the word «Complete»

Wiktionary

COMPLETE, verb. (transitive) To finish; to make done; to reach the end.
COMPLETE, verb. (transitive) To make whole or entire.
COMPLETE, adjective. With all parts included; with nothing missing; full.
COMPLETE, adjective. Finished; ended; concluded; completed.
COMPLETE, adjective. Generic intensifier.
COMPLETE, adjective. (analysis) (Of a metric space) in which every Cauchy sequence converges.
COMPLETE, adjective. (algebra) (Of a lattice) in which every set with a lower bound has a greatest lower bound.
COMPLETE, adjective. (math) (Of a category) in which all small limits exist.
COMPLETE, adjective. (logic) (of a proof system of a formal system)   With respect to a given semantics, that any well-formed formula which is (semantically) valid must also be provable.
COMPLETE, adjective. (computing theory) With respect to a complexity class, used of a problem that is in that class and such that every other problem in that class can be reduced to it (usually in polynomial time or logarithmic space).
COMPLETE ABORTION, noun. (medical) An abortion where all products of conception have been expelled.
COMPLETE ABORTIONS, noun. Plural of complete abortion
COMPLETE BLOOD COUNT, noun. A measure of the number, concentration, and size of white blood cells, platelets, and red blood cells in one's blood.
COMPLETE BLOOD COUNTS, noun. Plural of complete blood count
COMPLETE GAME, noun. (baseball) A statistic that denotes the number of times a starting pitcher pitched for the entirety of a game
COMPLETE GAME, noun. Used other than as an idiom: see complete,‎ game.
COMPLETE GRAPH, noun. (graph theory) A graph where every pair of vertices is connected by an edge.
COMPLETE GRAPHS, noun. Plural of complete graph
COMPLETE INTERNAL REFLECTION, noun. (optics) total internal reflection
COMPLETE INTERNAL REFLECTIONS, noun. Plural of complete internal reflection
COMPLETE LATTICE, noun. (algebra) A partially ordered set in which all subsets have both a supremum (join) and an infimum (meet).
COMPLETE LATTICES, noun. Plural of complete lattice
COMPLETE MEASURE, noun. (analysis) (of a measure) Such that for every set of measure zero belonging to its domain, all subsets of that set are also assigned measure zero by the given measure.
COMPLETE STREET, noun. A street that caters well to pedestrians, bicyclists, and mass transit users as well as to automobile users.
COMPLETE STREETS, noun. Plural of complete street

Dictionary definition

COMPLETE, verb. Come or bring to a finish or an end; "He finished the dishes"; "She completed the requirements for her Master's Degree"; "The fastest runner finished the race in just over 2 hours; others finished in over 4 hours".
COMPLETE, verb. Bring to a whole, with all the necessary parts or elements; "A child would complete the family".
COMPLETE, verb. Complete or carry out; "discharge one's duties".
COMPLETE, verb. Complete a pass.
COMPLETE, verb. Write all the required information onto a form; "fill out this questionnaire, please!"; "make out a form".
COMPLETE, adjective. Having every necessary or normal part or component or step; "a complete meal"; "a complete wardrobe"; "a complete set of the Britannica"; "a complete set of china"; "a complete defeat"; "a complete accounting".
COMPLETE, adjective. Perfect and complete in every respect; having all necessary qualities; "a complete gentleman"; "consummate happiness"; "a consummate performance".
COMPLETE, adjective. Highly skilled; "an accomplished pianist"; "a complete musician".
COMPLETE, adjective. Without qualification; used informally as (often pejorative) intensifiers; "an arrant fool"; "a complete coward"; "a consummate fool"; "a double-dyed villain"; "gross negligence"; "a perfect idiot"; "pure folly"; "what a sodding mess"; "stark staring mad"; "a thoroughgoing villain"; "utter nonsense"; "the unadulterated truth".
COMPLETE, adjective. Having come or been brought to a conclusion; "the harvesting was complete"; "the affair is over, ended, finished"; "the abruptly terminated interview".

Wise words

Abuse of words has been the great instrument of sophistry and chicanery, of party, faction, and division of society.
John Adams