Associations to the word «All»

Wiktionary

ALL, adverb. (degree) intensifier.
ALL, adverb. (poetic) Entirely.
ALL, adverb. Apiece; each.
ALL, adverb. (degree) So much.
ALL, adverb. (dialect) (Pennsylvania) All gone; dead.
ALL, adverb. (obsolete) (poetic) even; just
ALL, noun. (with a possessive pronoun) Everything possible.
ALL, noun. (countable) The totality of one's possessions.
ALL, conjunction. (obsolete) although
ALL AGES, adjective. (chiefly US) open to people of all ages, particularly to children under the age of 18 (of an entertainment event, particularly music or dance)
ALL ALONG, adverb. (duration) (idiomatic) For the entire time; always.
ALL ALONG, preposition. Used other than as an idiom: see all,‎ along.
ALL AND SOME, pronoun. (obsolete) (idiomatic) one and all
ALL AND SUNDRY, pronoun. (collectively) All; everyone.
ALL AND SUNDRY, pronoun. (separately) Each one.
ALL AROUND, adjective. Including everything about a topic: overall, all-encompassing.
ALL AT ONCE, adverb. (idiomatic) Unexpectedly; without warning; all of a sudden.
ALL AT ONCE, adverb. Used other than as an idiom: see All at the same time; all together.
ALL BARK AND NO BITE, adjective. (idiomatic) Full of big talk but lacking action, power, or substance; pretentious.
ALL BARK AND NO BITE, adjective. (idiomatic) Describes someone who often says cutting remarks, but actually has a soft personality underneath.
ALL BLACKS, proper noun. The national rugby union representative team of New Zealand
ALL BUT, adverb. Very nearly.
ALL BUT DISSERTATION, noun. (academics) See ABD.
ALL CAPS, noun. (typography) Text or a font in which all letters are capital letters.
ALL CAPS, noun. Alternative letter-case form of all caps
ALL CLEAR, noun. A signal that danger, such as an air raid, is over; usually a siren at a single pitch
ALL CLEAR, noun. Permission to proceed after obstacles have been removed
ALL COMERS, noun. Everyone who comes to a given event.
ALL DAY, adverb. For the period of an entire day.
ALL DOGGED UP, adjective. (slang) (originally US) Wearing stylish and fancy clothing, having dressed up.
ALL DOGGED-UP, adjective. Alternative spelling of all dogged up
ALL DRESSED UP AND NO PLACE TO GO, adjective. Alternative form of all dressed up and nowhere to go
ALL DRESSED UP AND NOWHERE TO GO, adjective. (idiomatic) Elaborately attired or otherwise fully prepared for an anticipated situation or activity which, nevertheless, fails to occur.
ALL DRESSED UP WITH NO PLACE TO GO, adjective. Alternative form of all dressed up and nowhere to go
ALL DRESSED UP WITH NOWHERE TO GO, adjective. Alternative form of all dressed up and nowhere to go
ALL EARS, adjective. (idiomatic) listening intently; fully focused
ALL EARS, adjective. (idiomatic) Awaiting an explanation.
ALL ELSE BEING EQUAL, adverb. (modal) Holding other conditions unchanged; ceteris paribus.
ALL ELSE THE SAME, adverb. Ceteris paribus.
ALL EYES, adjective. (idiomatic) Watching alertly or attentively.
ALL EYES, adjective. (idiomatic) Having prominent eyes.
ALL EYES, adjective. (idiomatic) (with for) Gazing at devotedly.
ALL EYES AND EARS, adjective. (idiomatic) To be attentive.
ALL FINGERS AND THUMBS, adjective. (of a person) clumsy or awkward
ALL FOOLS' DAY, noun. April 1, a day when practical jokes are traditionally played
ALL FOR, adjective. Completely in favour
ALL FOURS, noun. The four legs of a quadruped.
ALL FOURS, noun. The four limbs of a primate.
ALL FOURS, noun. A card game similar to whist.
ALL FUR COAT AND NO KNICKERS, adjective. (idiomatic) (derogatory) Having a superficially positive appearance that is belied by the reality, e.g., superficially elegant and beautiful but actually common.
ALL HAIL, interjection. All health; a phrase of salutation or welcome.
ALL HALLOWS, proper noun. (archaic) The saints, taken collectively. [from 10th c.]
ALL HALLOWS, proper noun. (chiefly archaic) All Saints' Day, the 1st of November; the Christian feast day honoring all Christian saints. [from 10th c.]
ALL HALLOWS' DAY, proper noun. A Christian feast day, 1st November, honouring the saints (or, as the name implies, "hallows"); the day after Halloween.
ALL HANDS, noun. All of the passengers and crew of a ship.
ALL HANDS ON DECK, interjection. (nautical) An order, on board ship, for all seamen of all watches to muster on deck immediately; normally shortened to "All hands"
ALL HAT AND NO CATTLE, adjective. (US) (idiomatic) Full of big talk but lacking action, power, or substance; pretentious.
ALL HOLIDAY, adjective. (idiomatic) (1811) A saying signifying that the business or person spoken of or alluded to is finished, i.e. that it has no future.
ALL HOLLOW, adverb. (idiomatic) As a foregone conclusion.
ALL HOLLOW, adverb. Misspelling of all hallow.
ALL IN, adjective. Very tired.
ALL IN, adjective. (chiefly UK) With everything included.
ALL IN, adjective. (poker) Being without any further stake to wager, but remaining active in a hand
ALL IN, noun. (poker) A hand where at least one player bets all of his or her chips.
ALL IN, noun. (poker) A player who is all in.
ALL IN A DAY'S WORK, adjective. (idiomatic) A nonchalant dismissal of a significant accomplishment.
ALL IN ALL, adverb. (modal) (set phrase) Generally, all things considered
ALL IN GOOD TIME, adverb. At a suitable moment in time.
ALL IN GOOD TIME, adverb. (as a set phrase) One should be patient.
ALL INS, noun. Plural of all in
ALL IT'S CRACKED UP TO BE, noun. (idiomatic) As good as claims or reputation would suggest.
ALL KIDDING ASIDE, adverb. (speech act) (idiomatic) Used to attempt to make a serious point in a jocular conversation.
ALL KINDS OF, adverb. (informal) Extremely.
ALL KINDS OF, adverb. Used other than as an idiom: see all,‎ kinds,‎ of.
ALL MOUTH AND NO TROUSERS, adjective. (British) (idiomatic) Alternative form of all mouth and trousers
ALL MOUTH AND TROUSERS, adjective. (British) (idiomatic) Superficial, engaging in empty, boastful talk, but not of real substance.
ALL MY EYE, noun. (dated) rubbish, humbug
ALL MY EYE AND BETTY MARTIN, noun. (dated) rubbish, humbug
ALL NATIONS, noun. (idiomatic) (1811) A composition of all the different spirits sold in a dram-shop, collected in a vessel into which the drainings of the bottles and quartern pots are emptied.
ALL NIGHT, adverb. For the period of an entire night.
ALL OF A SUDDEN, adverb. (set phrase) (colloquial) Suddenly, quickly.
ALL OF THE SUDDEN, adverb. (set phrase) Alternative form of all of a sudden
ALL ON A SUDDEN, adverb. (chiefly Scottish) Alternative form of all of a sudden
ALL ONE, noun. A matter of indifference; a matter having no importance or consequence.
ALL ONE'S EGGS IN ONE BASKET, noun. (idiomatic) The state of having invested heavily in just one area
ALL ONE'S EGGS IN ONE BASKET, noun. (idiomatic) The state of having devoted all of one’s resources to one thing
ALL ONE'S LIFE IS WORTH, noun. Alternative form of all one's life's worth
ALL ONE'S LIFE'S WORTH, noun. (idiomatic) A momentous matter; a very serious risk; a difficult task or situation.
ALL OUT, adjective. (cricket) The state of a side having no more men to bat, thus ending its innings.
ALL OUT, adverb. (idiomatic) With maximum effort.
ALL OUT, adverb. (idiomatic) Without regard for risk.
ALL OVER, adverb. (idiomatic) Over an entire extent.
ALL OVER, adverb. (idiomatic) Everywhere.
ALL OVER, adverb. (idiomatic) In every way; thoroughly.
ALL OVER, preposition. (idiomatic) Everywhere; covering completely.
ALL OVER AGAIN, adverb. Once again; one further time.
ALL OVER BUT THE SHOUTING, adjective. (idiomatic) The substance of the contest is complete, leaving only the cheering.
ALL OVER HELL'S HALF ACRE, adverb. (idiomatic) All over the place; everywhere.
ALL OVER THE BOARD, prepositional phrase. (idiomatic) Alternative form of all over the map
ALL OVER THE MAP, prepositional phrase. (idiomatic) Widely scattered or distributed; numerous and differing greatly.
ALL OVER THE MAP, prepositional phrase. (idiomatic) In widely scattered directions; in a widely varying manner.
ALL OVER THE PLACE, adjective. (idiomatic) Inconsistent; lacking a clear pattern; with a large amount of variation.
ALL OVER THE PLACE, adverb. (idiomatic) Using the available space thoroughly or completely.
ALL OVER THE PLACE, adverb. (idiomatic) In multiple directions, sometimes in a random or near random pattern.
ALL OVER THE PLACE, adverb. Everywhere
ALL OVER THE PLACE, prepositional phrase. (literally) Covering a location thoroughly or completely.
ALL OVER THE PLACE, prepositional phrase. (idiomatic) At multiple locations in the vicinity.
ALL OVER THE PLACE, prepositional phrase. (idiomatic) In multiple directions, sometimes in a random or near random pattern.
ALL OVER THE PLACE, prepositional phrase. (idiomatic) Lacking a clear pattern; with a large amount of variation.
ALL OVER THE SHOP, prepositional phrase. Alternative form of all over the place
ALL OVER WITH, adjective. (idiomatic) Completely finished; over.
ALL RIGHT, adjective. Good; in acceptable, if not excellent condition.
ALL RIGHT, adjective. In good health, unharmed.
ALL RIGHT, adverb. Fairly well
ALL RIGHT, adverb. (informal) Most certainly; for sure.
ALL RIGHT, interjection. Used to affirm, indicate agreement, or consent.
ALL RIGHT, interjection. Used to indicate support, favor or encouragement.
ALL RIGHT, interjection. Used to fill space or pauses.
ALL RIGHT, interjection. Used as a general lead-in or beginning.
ALL RIGHT, interjection. Used to express exasperation or frustration, often with already.
ALL RIGHT, interjection. (UK) (informal) Term of greeting, equivalent to how are you or hello.
ALL ROUNDER, noun. Alternative form of all-rounder
ALL ROUNDERS, noun. Plural of all rounder
ALL SAINTS DAY, noun. The Christian festival, held November 1, that commemorates all the saints (especially, in many churches, those who have died in the preceding year)
ALL SAINTS' DAY, proper noun. In Christian tradition, the annual feast day celebrating the life of all saints on the first day of November.
ALL SET, adjective. (idiomatic) Thoroughly ready; prepared.
ALL SINGING, ALL DANCING, adjective. Having many features, options or extras; sometimes used ironically to imply that the added features are just gimmicks.
ALL SIR GARNET, adjective. (UK) (slang) (dated) in order; perfect.
ALL SIZZLE AND NO STEAK, noun. (idiomatic) A thing or person which fails to measure up to its description or advanced promotion.
ALL SOULS' DAY, proper noun. (Christianity) An annual feast day celebrating the faithful departed on the second day of November, immediately following All Saints' Day.
ALL SOULS' DAY, proper noun. (Chinese) Alternative term for Tomb Sweeping Day
ALL SQUARE, adjective. (sports) (games) (etc.) All players or teans having the same score; tied, drawn.
ALL SYSTEMS GO, interjection. (aerospace) (slang) "Everything is ready"; originally used in the aerospace industry to indicate preparedness to launch.
ALL TALK AND NO ACTION, adjective. Speaking, promising, or boasting much, but doing little.
ALL TALK AND NO CIDER, adjective. (idiomatic) all talk and no results.
ALL THAT, noun. That, and everything similar; all of that kind of thing; and so on, et cetera. [from 15th c.]
ALL THAT, adjective. (US) (slang) Of especially good quality; particularly excellent. [from 20th c.]
ALL THAT, adverb. (idiomatic) Very.
ALL THAT AND A BAG OF CHIPS, adjective. (slang) very special
ALL THAT JAZZ, noun. (idiomatic) Everything else related to something; other similar things.
ALL THAT ONE'S LIFE IS WORTH, noun. Alternative form of all one's life's worth
ALL THAT ONE'S LIFE'S WORTH, noun. Alternative form of all one's life's worth
ALL THE BEST, interjection. Used to wish someone good luck
ALL THE LESS, adverb. Even less
ALL THE MARBLES, noun. (idiomatic) everything; all that is to be had
ALL THE MORE, adverb. Even more; notably, but even more notably due to additional information, either preceding or following the statement.
ALL THE RAGE, adjective. (idiomatic) Very fashionable and popular, like a craze
ALL THE SAME, adverb. Used other than as an idiom: see all,‎ the,‎ same.
ALL THE SAME, adverb. (idiomatic) Anyway; nevertheless; nonetheless.
ALL THE TEA IN CHINA, noun. (idiomatic) (hyperbole) Something very valuable or priceless.
ALL THE TIME, adverb. (set phrase) (duration) Always; constantly; for the complete duration.
ALL THE TIME, adverb. (set phrase) (frequency) Very often; frequently.
ALL THE WAY, adverb. To the end.
ALL THE WAY, adverb. (of food) With every typical accoutrement (condiment).
ALL THE WAY TO EGERY AND BACK, noun. (British) (idiomatic) The long way; a roundabout route; a long distance to travel.
ALL THE WHILE, conjunction. At the same time as, usually over an extended period.
ALL THE WORLD, noun. Everyone.
ALL THERE, adjective. (colloquial) mentally competent; not absentminded
ALL THINGS BEING EQUAL, adverb. (idiomatic) Without considering or being affected by external factors.
ALL THINGS CONSIDERED, adverb. (modal) (idiomatic) Generally speaking; in terms of the big picture.
ALL THINGS CONSIDERED, adverb. (modal) (idiomatic) Despite possible indications to the contrary.
ALL THINGS CONSIDERED, adverb. (modal) (idiomatic) Within the constraints of the situation.
ALL THUMBS, adjective. (idiomatic) Clumsy; awkward; not dextrous.
ALL TO, adverb. (archaic) completely, totally.
ALL TO SMASH, adverb. (idiomatic) Ruined; bankrupt.
ALL TO SMASH, adverb. (idiomatic) completely, to the point of destruction.
ALL TOGETHER, adverb. Altogether
ALL TOGETHER, adverb. Used in literal contexts: see all,‎ together.
ALL TOGETHER, adverb. All at the same time
ALL TOLD, adverb. (idiomatic) With everything included, counted, or summed.
ALL TOO, adverb. Very, extremely; excessively.
ALL UP WITH, preposition. Over for, finished for (negative connotation.)
ALL VERY WELL, adjective. (idiomatic) All right, to a certain extent.
ALL VERY WELL, adjective. (idiomatic) True, as far as it goes.
ALL WET, adjective. (literally) Thoroughly soaked; drenched.
ALL WET, adjective. (idiomatic) Utterly incorrect; erroneous; uninformed.
ALL WHITES, proper noun. The men's national association football (soccer) representative team of New Zealand
ALL Y'ALL, pronoun. (idiomatic) (chiefly US) (regional) (dialect) (US South) (colloquial) Plural form of you.
ALL Y'ALL'S, pronoun. (idiomatic) (chiefly Southern US) (colloquial) Possessive of all y'all (standing in for all your).

Dictionary definition

ALL, adverb. To a complete degree or to the full or entire extent (`whole' is often used informally for `wholly'); "he was wholly convinced"; "entirely satisfied with the meal"; "it was completely different from what we expected"; "was completely at fault"; "a totally new situation"; "the directions were all wrong"; "it was not altogether her fault"; "an altogether new approach"; "a whole new idea".
ALL, adjective. Quantifier; used with either mass or count nouns to indicate the whole number or amount of or every one of a class; "we sat up all night"; "ate all the food"; "all men are mortal"; "all parties are welcome".
ALL, adjective. Completely given to or absorbed by; "became all attention".

Wise words

Strong and bitter words indicate a weak cause.
Victor Hugo