Associations to the word «Came»

Wiktionary

COME, verb. (intransitive) To move from further away to nearer to.
COME, verb. To move towards the speaker.
COME, verb. To move towards the listener.
COME, verb. To move towards the object that is the focus of the sentence.
COME, verb. (in subordinate clauses and gerunds) To move towards the agent or subject of the main clause.
COME, verb. To move towards an unstated agent.
COME, verb. (intransitive) To arrive.
COME, verb. (intransitive) To appear, to manifest itself.
COME, verb. (intransitive) To take a position to something else in a sequence.
COME, verb. (intransitive) (slang) To achieve orgasm; to cum.
COME, verb. (copulative) (figuratively) (with close) To approach a state of being or accomplishment.
COME, verb. (figuratively) (with to) To take a particular approach or point of view in regard to something.
COME, verb. (copulative) (archaic) To become, to turn out to be.
COME, verb. (intransitive) To be supplied, or made available; to exist.
COME, verb. (slang) To carry through; to succeed in.
COME, verb. (intransitive) Happen.
COME, verb. (intransitive) (with from or sometimes of) To have a social background.
COME, verb. To be or have been a resident or native.
COME, verb. To have been brought up by or employed by.
COME, verb. (intransitive) (of grain) To germinate.
COME, noun. (obsolete) Coming, arrival; approach.
COME, noun. (slang) Semen, or female ejaculatory discharge.
COME, preposition. Used to indicate an event, period, or change in state occurring after a present time.
COME, interjection. An exclamation to express annoyance.
COME, interjection. An exclamation to express encouragement, or to precede a request.
COME A CROPPER, verb. (archaic) To fall headlong from a horse.
COME A CROPPER, verb. (British) (idiomatic) To suffer some misfortune; to fail.
COME A LONG WAY, verb. (idiomatic) To make significant progress.
COME ABOUT, verb. To come to pass; to develop; to occur; to take place; to happen.
COME ABOUT, verb. (nautical) To tack; to change tack; to maneuver the bow of a sailing vessel across the wind so that the wind changes from one side of the vessel to the other; to position a boat with respect to the wind after tacking. See also come to.
COME ABOUT, verb. To change; to come round.
COME ACROSS, verb. (idiomatic) To give an appearance or impression; to project a certain image.
COME ACROSS, verb. To find, usually by accident.
COME AFTER, verb. To pursue, follow
COME AFTER, verb. To follow, to succeed, to be the successor of
COME AGAIN, verb. (idiomatic) (informal) Could you repeat that? Repeat that please. a polite formula used when one has not heard or understood what has been said
COME AGAIN, verb. (idiomatic) Used as a polite farewell to a visitor, inviting a return visit.
COME ALOFT, verb. (obsolete) (slang) To mount sexually; also, to have an erection.
COME ALONG, verb. (intransitive) (followed by "with") To accompany
COME ALONG, verb. (idiomatic) (intransitive) To progress; to make progress.
COME ALONG, noun. (technical) A type of hand-operated winch used to tighten straps
COME AND GO, verb. (idiomatic) To alternately enter and exit into something (physically or figuratively)
COME AND GO, verb. (idiomatic) To repeatedly appear and disappear (said especially of a feeling or pain)
COME AND GONE, verb. Past participle of come and go
COME APART, verb. Used other than as an idiom: see come,‎ apart.
COME APART, verb. (intransitive) to break, separate.
COME AROUND, verb. (idiomatic) To change one's mind, especially to begin to agree or appreciate what one was reluctant to accept at first.
COME AROUND, verb. To regain consciousness after a faint etc.
COME AT, verb. Used other than as an idiom: see come,‎ at.
COME AT, verb. (obsolete) To come to; to attend.
COME AT, verb. (obsolete) To enter into sexual relations with.
COME AT, verb. To get to, especially with effort or difficulty.
COME AT, verb. To attack, to harass.
COME AT, verb. (Australia) (New Zealand) (transitive) (slang) To accept (a situation); to agree to do; to try.
COME AT A PRICE, verb. To have disadvantages
COME AWAY, verb. (intransitive) (of two objects) to become separated from something away.
COME AWAY, verb. (intransitive) To distance oneself (from)
COME AWAY, verb. To leave a place or cease an activity in a particular mood or condition.
COME BACK, verb. (intransitive) To return to a place.
COME BACK, verb. (intransitive) To return to one's possession, especially of memories.
COME BACK, verb. (intransitive) To return to a former state, usually a desirable one.
COME BACK, verb. (intransitive) To retort.
COME BACK FROM THE DEAD, verb. To be revived after dying
COME BACK FROM THE DEAD, verb. To return after being presumed dead
COME BACK FROM THE DEAD, verb. (chiefly sports) To experience a resurgence after one's productive years were assumed to have ended
COME BEFORE, verb. (transitive) To appear publicly in front of someone superior.
COME BEFORE, verb. (transitive) to be of greater importance (than)
COME BEFORE, verb. (transitive) to be judged, decided or discussed by authority.
COME BEFORE, verb. (transitive) To precede.
COME BETWEEN, verb. (transitive) to affect negatively.
COME BY, verb. (transitive) To obtain; to get, especially by chance or involuntarily.
COME BY, verb. (intransitive) To come near to; to pass; to visit.
COME BY, interjection. A command to a sheepdog to move clockwise around the sheep
COME CLEAN, verb. (idiomatic) To confess; admit the truth.
COME CORRECT, verb. (AAVE) (intransitive) To behave properly or decently; to do the right thing.
COME DOWN, verb. To descend, fall.
COME DOWN, verb. To decrease.
COME DOWN, verb. To reach a decision.
COME DOWN, verb. To be passed through time.
COME DOWN, verb. (idiomatic) To return from an elevated state of consciousness or emotion.
COME DOWN ON, verb. (transitive) to punish
COME DOWN THE LINE, verb. Alternative term for come down the pike
COME DOWN THE PIKE, verb. (idiomatic) (of an event, thing, person) To emerge, come up; to approach or arrive on the scene; to present (itself or oneself).
COME DOWN THE ROAD, verb. Alternative term for come down the pike
COME DOWN TO, verb. To reach by moving down or reducing.
COME DOWN TO, verb. (idiomatic) To depend upon, basically, ultimately or in essence.
COME DOWN TO EARTH, verb. (idiomatic) (of an event, thing, person) To be brought back to reality; to lose one's dreams.
COME DOWN TO US, verb. (idiomatic) To survive to the present day; to be extant in some form.
COME DOWN WITH, verb. (idiomatic) To contract or get; to show symptoms of an illness.
COME FIRST, verb. (idiomatic) To win first place in a competition.
COME FIRST, verb. (idiomatic) To be the most important thing to consider.
COME FOR, verb. (transitive) to search for something or someone, in order to catch them/it.
COME FORTH, verb. To move forward and into view, to emerge, to appear.
COME FORWARD, verb. Used other than as an idiom: see come,‎ forward.
COME FORWARD, verb. (intransitive) (idiomatic) To offer help or information (especially, about a crime).
COME FROM, verb. (transitive) To have as one's birthplace or nationality.
COME FROM, verb. (transitive) To be derived from.
COME FROM A GOOD PLACE, verb. (idiomatic) To be motivated by decency, kindness, or good intentions.
COME FROM BEHIND, verb. (sports) To be in a winning position after having been in a losing position.
COME FROM THE RIGHT PLACE, verb. Alternative term for come from a good place
COME FULL CIRCLE, verb. (idiomatic) To make a complete change or reform.
COME FULL CIRCLE, verb. (idiomatic) To complete a cycle of transition, returning to where one started after gaining experience or exploring other things.
COME HELL OR HIGH WATER, adverb. (idiomatic) Regardless of the hardships.
COME HITHER, adjective. Alternative spelling of come-hither
COME HOME TO ROOST, verb. (idiomatic) Bad consequences of actions inevitably coming to pass.
COME IN, verb. Used other than as an idiom: see come,‎ in.
COME IN, verb. To enter.
COME IN, verb. To arrive.
COME IN, verb. To become relevant, applicable, or useful.
COME IN, verb. To become available.
COME IN, verb. (of a broadcast, such as radio or television) To have a strong enough signal to be able to be received well.
COME IN, verb. (music) To join or enter; to begin playing with a group.
COME IN, verb. (often imperative) To begin transmitting.
COME IN, verb. To function in the indicated manner.
COME IN, verb. (of a fugitive or a person in hiding) To surrender; to turn oneself in.
COME IN, verb. To finish a race or similar competition in a particular position, such as first place, second place, or the like.
COME IN, verb. To finish a race or similar competition in first place.
COME IN FOR, verb. (transitive) to be subjected to
COME IN FOR, verb. (literally) come in for
COME IN FROM THE COLD, verb. (idiomatic) To gain widespread acceptance in a group or society, especially where there was not any before.
COME IN HANDY, verb. (idiomatic) (informal) To be useful or helpful, especially at some time in the future.
COME IN USE, verb. To be utile and merit usage.
COME INTO, verb. Used other than as an idiom: see See come and into.
COME INTO, verb. (transitive) To inherit (money).
COME INTO, verb. (transitive) To be a factor in.
COME INTO, verb. (transitive) To enter the initial phase of; to commence.
COME INTO BEING, verb. (idiomatic) To form; to start to exist.
COME INTO EFFECT, verb. To become enforceable, or applicable.
COME INTO FORCE, verb. To become valid or active (of a law, regulation etc.).
COME INTO ITS OWN, verb. To be very helpful or to do well in a particular situation
COME INTO ONE'S OWN, verb. (idiomatic) To reach a stage of development or maturity where one has achieved strength and confidence, economic security, or respect and social acceptance.
COME INTO PLAY, verb. To become involved, start to play a role
COME IT, verb. (UK) (slang) To pretend
COME IT, verb. (UK) (slang) To exaggerate
COME IT, verb. (UK) (slang) To be impudent
COME IT, verb. (slang) To succeed in a trick of any sort.
COME OF, verb. To result from.
COME OF AGE, verb. (idiomatic) To reach a specific age where one is legally considered to be an adult.
COME OF AGE, verb. (idiomatic) To mature, or become fully developed.
COME OFF, verb. (obsolete) To come away (from a place); to leave.
COME OFF, verb. To become detached.
COME OFF, verb. To have some success, to succeed.
COME OFF, verb. (dated) To have an orgasm.
COME OFF, verb. To appear; to seem; to project a certain quality.
COME OFF IT, interjection. (UK) An expression of disbelief.
COME ON, noun. Alternative form of come-on
COME ON, verb. Used other than as an idiom: see come,‎ on.
COME ON, verb. (intransitive) (idiomatic) (with to) To show sexual or relational interest through words or sometimes actions.
COME ON, verb. (intransitive) To appear on a television broadcast.
COME ON, verb. (intransitive) To progress, to develop.
COME ON, verb. (intransitive) (idiomatic) (colloquial) (UK) To get one's period, start menstruating.
COME ON, verb. (transitive) To encounter, discover; to come upon.
COME ON, verb. (sports) (of a substitute) To enter the playing field.
COME ON, interjection. An expression of encouragement.
COME ON, interjection. An expression of disbelief.
COME ON, interjection. Hurry up
COME ON, interjection. An expression of exasperation, of impatience.
COME ON DOWN, interjection. An invitation to someone in the upstairs part of a building to come downstairs.
COME ON DOWN, interjection. An invitation to someone living to the north to come for a visit.
COME ON DOWN, interjection. A catchphrase used on the television game show "The Price is Right," inviting a member of the audience to come to Contestant's Row to play the game.
COME ON HOME, verb. To return home; to come back home.
COME ON OVER, verb. (intransitive) (idiomatic) to visit someone's home.
COME ON TO, verb. (transitive) (informal) To make a romantic or sexual advance to; to hit on.
COME ON TO, verb. To start to.
COME ONLINE, verb. (idiomatic) To enter service or become active.
COME ONLINE, verb. (idiomatic) To login to an internet communication system, such as an instant messenger, online game or forum.
COME ONS, noun. Plural of come on
COME OUT, verb. To be discovered, be revealed.
COME OUT, verb. To be published, be issued.
COME OUT, verb. (as a debutante) To make a formal debut in society.
COME OUT, verb. To end up or result.
COME OUT, verb. (cricket) (of a batsman) To walk onto the field at the beginning of an innings.
COME OUT, verb. (idiomatic) (informal) To come out of the closet.
COME OUT, verb. To be deducted from.
COME OUT, verb. To leave (out of), exit from.
COME OUT IN, verb. (transitive) to be afflicted by (a visible disruption of the body)
COME OUT IN THE WASH, verb. (idiomatic) Of problems or difficulties, to work out, resolve, or become understood eventually and naturally.
COME OUT OF ONE'S SHELL, verb. (idiomatic) To reveal one's true self.
COME OUT OF ONE'S SHELL, verb. (idiomatic) To become a naturist. To convert to naturism.
COME OUT OF THE CLOSET, verb. (intransitive) (idiomatic) To tell others about homosexuality, bisexuality or any minority or disapproved-of belief, preference, etc., where previously this had been kept secret.
COME OUT OF THE WOODWORK, verb. (idiomatic) to appear or emerge unexpectedly or inexplicably, frequently in large numbers or quantity.
COME OUT SMELLING LIKE A ROSE, verb. Alternative form of smell like a rose
COME OUT SMELLING OF ROSES, verb. Alternative form of smell like a rose
COME OUT SWINGING, verb. (idiomatic) To initiate an encounter or interaction by behaving in an unrestrainedly aggressive, confrontational, or accusatory manner.
COME OUT SWINGING, verb. (idiomatic) To display spunk and strength of character, especially when rising above or when fighting back against trouble or adversity.
COME OUT WITH, verb. (transitive) To say something unexpected.
COME OVER, verb. (transitive) To affect
COME OVER, verb. (intransitive) To change ones position or location, especially to someone's place of residence.
COME ROUND, verb. To change direction.
COME ROUND, verb. To change one's opinion to a prevailing one.
COME ROUND, verb. To return to a former condition.
COME ROUND, verb. To recover consciousness, to come to
COME ROUND, verb. To cease anger or hostility.
COME ROUND, verb. To visit someone's home or other regular place.
COME THE ACID, verb. (slang) (obsolete) to exaggerate.
COME THE ACID, verb. (slang) (dated) to make oneself unpleasant, especially by sarcasm.
COME THE RAW PRAWN, verb. (Australia) (informal) (intransitive) To attempt to deceive or impose upon.
COME THICK AND FAST, verb. (idiomatic) To appear repeatedly.
COME THROUGH, verb. (idiomatic) To survive, to endure.
COME THROUGH, verb. (intransitive) (idiomatic) To succeed.
COME THROUGH, verb. (with an object preceded by the preposition for) Not to let somebody down, keep one's promise.
COME TO, verb. (intransitive) (idiomatic) To recover consciousness after fainting etc.
COME TO, verb. (intransitive) (idiomatic) (nautical) To stop a sailing vessel, especially by turning into the wind. See also come about.
COME TO, verb. (transitive) To total; to amount to.
COME TO, verb. (transitive) To reach; to arrive at.
COME TO, verb. (transitive) To devote attention to in due course; to come around to.
COME TO, verb. (transitive) To befall; to affect; to happen to; to come upon.
COME TO, verb. (transitive) (usually in present tense) To regard or specify, as narrowing a field of choices by category.
COME TO A CLOSE, verb. (idiomatic) To draw toward a conclusion; to end.
COME TO A HEAD, verb. (idiomatic) To rapidly come to a turning point.
COME TO A HEAD, verb. (idiomatic) To suddenly reveal that which has lain latent for a time.
COME TO A HEAD, verb. (idiomatic) To suddenly make mature or perfected that which was inchoate or imperfectly formed.
COME TO A HEAD, verb. (medicine) (of an abscess) To reach its final stage
COME TO AN END, verb. (idiomatic) (intransitive) To stop; to cease; to no longer continue.
COME TO BLOWS, verb. (idiomatic) To fight; to initiate physical conflict, especially subsequent to escalating tension or antagonism.
COME TO GRIEF, verb. (idiomatic) To have a disastrous outcome.
COME TO GRIPS, verb. (intransitive) (of two opponents) To confront each other decisively.
COME TO GRIPS, verb. (intransitive) To attempt to face or resolve an internal contradiction or difficulty.
COME TO GRIPS, verb. (intransitive) (with "with" or anaphorically) See come to grips with.
COME TO GRIPS WITH, verb. (idiomatic) To confront or deal with directly; to commence a confrontation.
COME TO HAND, verb. To become available, often unexpectedly, or randomly.
COME TO HAND, verb. (US) (horses) To perform well, to come under control.
COME TO JESUS, verb. (idiomatic) (Christianity) To experience or display a conversion or recommitment to Christianity or to undergo a related ritual, especially public confession of one's sins or weaknesses.
COME TO JESUS, verb. (idiomatic) (US) To become committed or display commitment to a cause.
COME TO LIFE, verb. (intransitive) (idiomatic) to bring back to life; revitalize, revive, resurrect
COME TO LIFE, verb. (intransitive) (idiomatic) to become alive, bring into existence
COME TO LIFE, verb. (intransitive) (idiomatic) to appear as if alive
COME TO LIFE, verb. To start to become energetic.
COME TO LIGHT, verb. (idiomatic) To become known; to be revealed.
COME TO MIND, verb. (idiomatic) To appear in one's thoughts.
COME TO NOTHING, verb. (idiomatic) To fail completely; to have no result.
COME TO NOUGHT, verb. (idiomatic) To fail completely; to have no result
COME TO ONESELF, verb. (intransitive) (idiomatic) to gain consciousness or self-control
COME TO ORDER, verb. (intransitive) (of a meeting, assembly, proceeding, legislature, court) To come to an orderly state allowing it to conduct its business.
COME TO PASS, verb. To happen; to occur.
COME TO POWER, verb. To be installed in high office, such as kingship, presidency, or prime ministership.
COME TO POWER, verb. Past participle of come to power.
COME TO SOMEONE'S AID, verb. (idiomatic) To assist and rescue someone.
COME TO SOMEONE'S RESCUE, verb. (idiomatic) To rescue (or save) someone from further harm
COME TO TERMS, verb. (idiomatic) (of two or more parties) (often with a prepositional phrase) to reach an agreement or settle a dispute.
COME TO TERMS, verb. (idiomatic) (with "with") See come to terms with.
COME TO TERMS WITH, verb. (idiomatic) To resolve a conflict with.
COME TO TERMS WITH, verb. (idiomatic) To accept or resign oneself to something emotionally painful
COME TO THAT, adverb. For that matter
COME TO THE FORE, verb. (idiomatic) To become obvious or visible.
COME TO THE SCRATCH, verb. (prizefighting) To step up to the scratch or mark made in the ring to be toed by the combatants in beginning a contest.
COME TO THE SCRATCH, verb. (figurative) (colloquial) To meet an antagonist or a difficulty bravely.
COME TO THINK OF IT, adverb. (idiomatic) by the way; now that I think about it; indicates something brought to mind.
COME TO TIME, verb. (dated) To come forward in order to resume the contest when the interval allowed for rest is over and "time" is called;
COME TO TIME, verb. To keep an appointment; to meet expectations.
COME TOGETHER, verb. (intransitive) To assemble; congregate.
COME TRUE, verb. To become real: to become true or existent.
COME TRUE, verb. (biology) To breed true; to maintain identity of salient characteristics through propagation processes.
COME UNDER, verb. (literally) To come underneath (something).
COME UNDER, verb. To be included or classified under (a title, specified class etc.).
COME UNDER, verb. To be subjected to, be under the auspices of.
COME UNDONE, verb. (colloquial) to become disintegrated, to break into parts or pieces.
COME UNHINGED, verb. (idiomatic) To become angered or crazy; to lose control of one's senses or sanity.
COME UNSTUCK, verb. (idiomatic) (British) To get into trouble, to have an accident or mishap, to go off the rails.
COME UP, verb. Used other than as an idiom: see come,‎ up.
COME UP, verb. To appear before a judge or court.
COME UP, verb. (intransitive) To come towards, to approach.
COME UP, verb. (idiomatic) (intransitive) To emerge or become known, especially unexpectedly; to come to attention, present itself.
COME UP, verb. (British) (slang) (intransitive) To begin to feel the effects of a recreational drug.
COME UP, verb. (UK) (Oxford University) To arrive at the university. (Compare go down, send down.)
COME UP ROSES, verb. (idiomatic) To enter into a condition or situation which is favorable; to develop in a pleasing or advantageous manner.
COME UP SMELLING LIKE A ROSE, verb. Alternative form of smell like a rose
COME UP SMELLING OF ROSES, verb. Alternative form of smell like a rose
COME UP TO, verb. (transitive) to approach
COME UP WITH, verb. (idiomatic) To invent, create, or think of.
COME UPON, verb. To come across; to encounter; to stumble upon; to discover or find, especially by chance or accident.
COME UPON, verb. To befall; to affect; to happen to.
COME WHAT MAY, adverb. (idiomatic) In spite of anything that might happen; whatever may occur.
COME WITH, verb. (intransitive) (informal) (regional) To join and come along.
COME WITH THE TERRITORY, verb. (idiomatic) To be a common, and often inconvenient, accompaniment of an occupation, situation, or occurrence.

Dictionary definition

COME, noun. The thick white fluid containing spermatozoa that is ejaculated by the male genital tract.
COME, verb. Move toward, travel toward something or somebody or approach something or somebody; "He came singing down the road"; "Come with me to the Casbah"; "come down here!"; "come out of the closet!"; "come into the room".
COME, verb. Reach a destination; arrive by movement or progress; "She arrived home at 7 o'clock"; "She didn't get to Chicago until after midnight".
COME, verb. Come to pass; arrive, as in due course; "The first success came three days later"; "It came as a shock"; "Dawn comes early in June".
COME, verb. Reach or enter a state, relation, condition, use, or position; "The water came to a boil"; "We came to understand the true meaning of life"; "Their anger came to a boil"; "I came to realize the true meaning of life"; "The shoes came untied"; "come into contact with a terrorist group"; "his face went red"; "your wish will come true".
COME, verb. To be the product or result; "Melons come from a vine"; "Understanding comes from experience".
COME, verb. Be found or available; "These shoes come in three colors; The furniture comes unassembled".
COME, verb. Come forth; "A scream came from the woman's mouth"; "His breath came hard".
COME, verb. Be a native of; "She hails from Kalamazoo".
COME, verb. Extend or reach; "The water came up to my waist"; "The sleeves come to your knuckles".
COME, verb. Exist or occur in a certain point in a series; "Next came the student from France".
COME, verb. Cover a certain distance; "She came a long way".
COME, verb. Come under, be classified or included; "fall into a category"; "This comes under a new heading".
COME, verb. Happen as a result; "Nothing good will come of this".
COME, verb. Add up in number or quantity; "The bills amounted to $2,000"; "The bill came to $2,000".
COME, verb. Develop into; "This idea will never amount to anything"; "nothing came of his grandiose plans".
COME, verb. Be received; "News came in of the massacre in Rwanda".
COME, verb. Come to one's mind; suggest itself; "It occurred to me that we should hire another secretary"; "A great idea then came to her".
COME, verb. Come from; be connected by a relationship of blood, for example; "She was descended from an old Italian noble family"; "he comes from humble origins".
COME, verb. Proceed or get along; "How is she doing in her new job?"; "How are you making out in graduate school?"; "He's come a long way".
COME, verb. Experience orgasm; "she could not come because she was too upset".
COME, verb. Have a certain priority; "My family comes first".

Wise words

A blow with a word strikes deeper than a blow with a sword.
Robert Burton